Tag Archives: hangeul

Best way to Read Korean on an eReader

WZE8O0.md.pngI think reading is effective for learning your target language only if you find a way to make it more comprehensible. You still get benefit from reading a lot while looking up nothing but the benefit is so minuscule compared to reading something on the kindle where you can look up stuff instantaneously with very little effort due to its amazing pop-up dictionary ( You can even generate anki cards from the dictionary look ups via anki plugins). I have been looking into how to read a korean ebook (without drm) with dictionary look-up on an ereader this past week because I really hate how I can’t look up anything on the kindle. Your only option for learning Korean on the kindle is to highlight all the sentences you want to look up later as you read. I thought if insert hanja into the text via hanjaro that that would be enough to make reading in Korean on the kindle more conducive to learning but it’s not enough. Usually I more often don’t know korean-korean words as opposed to sino-words when I read Korean since I use hanjaro (and most or half the time it’s correct or at least helpful). What I especially love about the kindle is that I have no desire to add words to anki when I read stuff on it. The reason is that my interest in the word in question is at its peak the moment read it in the compelling book while possessing the knowledge of the full context. So when I look up the word on the kindle my curiosity is usually completely satisfied and I understand the sentence much better than before I looked it up ( don’t know about you but I usually suck at guessing/inferencing from the meaning of an unknown word based on text) and I could care less whether or not I’ll remember the meaning of the word or the word itself 30 minutes from that moment (Also I never understood the appeal of language notebooks where you copy the dictionary/example sentence etc in a notebook when you look-up words while reading… sounds time-consuming and ineffective to me). I sometimes highlight sentences and stuff if there are stuff I want to look up that I can’t look up or find in the kindleWZEAUD.md.png dictionary but that’s rare.

So it is possible to make a kindle dictionary for Korean-English. I came across one, I made 2 of them myself (from lingoes dictionary) but it seems like the kindle’s firmware doesn’t allow it to work somehow?? The dictionaries show up on the kindle but then when I look up a korean word it keeps pointing me to this same dictionary entry (I think it was margarita lol. I was livid since I was so close) regardless of what word I press on. They just don’t work on the kindle but there’s nothing wrong with the dictionary files themselves. I know they’re formatted perfectly exactly the way kindle wants it.

WZEiZq.md.png<— The brown thing at the bottom is a woodenbookholder I got off amazon. I highly recommend GETTING one if you read books.

I got the boyue likebook 7.8 inch ANDROID ereader in 2018 or 2017 (can’t remember) for the purpose of reading manga since the price seemed reasonable (to search for other android ereaders check out the good ereader blog or ebook reader blog). It was around $185 and I figured if I read 37 manga I would’ve gotten my money’s worth. I definitely did since JIN is 20 volumes, bokutachi ga yarimasita is 9 volumes and liar game is 19 volumes and I read other stuff too. It’s ironic because right now I’m not reading any manga on it. I will go back to manga once I finish reading this PDF of this korean novel (I think it’s a light novel if such a genre exists in Korean writing).

During my kindle investigation I realized that android ereaders might be the ONLY SOLUTION. I found this forum post about using goldendict as a pop-up dictionary on the Moon+ Reader app. So I got the apps and loaded all the stardict dictionaries (they’re available for free! Just google) for Korean onto it and it works! I loaded Naver Korean-japanese, korean-korean,  quick korean-english, edocu korean-english from lingoes, and vicom korean-english (I think the naver dictionaries are from 2009 because they match the lingoes dictionaries that were uploaded in 2009. ). Coincidentally the max number of dictionaries for the free version of goldendict is 5 dictionaries. The downsides are the lag and that the pop-up dictionary only does exact match. I mention lag because it’s slower than a tablet or a smartphone since it’s an ereader but it’s not ridiculously laggy and slow. Also if you were to read it on the smartphoWZuHjF.md.jpgne/tablet you can configure it so the word is looked up on naver so you don’t have to do any deconjugating. As for the exact match, I sometimes have to erase letters just so the goldendict dictionary suggests “are you looking for this word?” in the dictionary window and then I click on the word in question. Other times I partially select the word before hitting dictionary look-up so that goldendict can suggest the word once the dictionary window opens. For example for 가다듬기  I selected 가다듬 then clicked dic to bring the dictionary up, then tapped on the search bar, at that point goldendict gives me suggestions such as 가다듬다 which I click on. For stuff like 서려서, I would either highlight the whole sentence to look up later or type 서리다 in the dictionary window ( only problem is I risk the chance of wasting my time if the word is in none of the dictionaries anyway. For some reason goldendict adds a space at the end of the word but it doesn’t affect the search results so I don’t bother erasing it and just type whatever I need to type to bring up the results ) . Also if the dictionary entry defines the word as a stronger/weaker version of x I can long press on x, copy it, then paste it in the search bar. Combining hanjaro with this pop-up dictionary makes reading in Korean so much more fun (since obviously it’s more fun when you understand what you’re reading), less burdensome, less exhausting, conducive to learning, and I feel no pressure to make up anki cards for words I look up. I like reading korean with hanja inserted as I explained in my love letter to hanjaro! Moonreader has other dictionary options like google translate and some other web translations but I never use them. I am kinda frugal so that part of me likes how this method does not require Wi-fi. One ofWZulq3.md.jpg the advantages of an ereader versus the smartphone/tablet IS the battery life… Though this isn’t as convenient and ideal as clicking on a word to have it looked up on naver dictionary automatically unconjugated, it’s still incredibly helpful and convenient for me at my current korean level since I’m not a beginner. I can imagine that this ereader reading method may not have much appeal to someone who has to look up 10-20 words a page. Though I would recommend such a person to do something else and go back to novels later since it sounds like the book is too hard or their Korean would be better improved through other activities.

Actually now that I think about it, even if the dictionary worked in kindle it’s inferior to goldendict since it searches via exact matches (most of the korean dictionaries don’t have the inflections included) and it doesn’t give you the option to search the dictionary like with the 가다듬다 example I mentioned. As far as I know that only one of the 5 dictionaries has inflections (all the manys ways you conjugate stuff ie 가다듬다, 가다듬기. Korean grammar is super convoluted so the inflection list would be very long if you were to make a kindle dictionary that functions well. ) but even thenWZu7fr.md.jpg it has less entries than naver korean-japanese dictionaries so I’m not sure how helpful it’d be. After all the whole point of reading novels is so you can come across words you don’t necessarily hear/read everyday.

Because goldendict doesn’t dictionary save look-ups, the only way to save sentences to make anki cards is to highlight or add notes on the ereader app. The moon+ reader app allows multiple highlight options such as squiggly line, straight line, different colors. I stuck with the squiggly line since I like the way it looks. To highlight I long press on a word, extend the highlight as far as I need it to be extended, then click on the highlight option among the options of HIGHLIGHT, NOTE, and DICTIONARY. I’ve accidentally looked up whole sentences in the dictionary by mistake due to mis-press. Moon+ reader allows export of notes and highlights one book at a time so you can’t export your highlight/notes for all the books you read at once on the ereader. That’s not a deal breaker for me since it makes sense for me to e-mail the highlights/notes after finishing a book rather than months after finishing the book. To send it, go into the book, double press in the center to bring up the notes/bookmarks options, go in to the bookmarks section, then press SHARE. Under share it brings up many options but I stuck with the one that involved emailing it via gmail.

It was formatted like this in the e-mail. It shows the title of the book, author, number of highlights, number of notes, the highlights in CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER. Each highlight is preceded by a square which I appreciate. Considering that the book is 300 pages long, I think 199 highlights + 3 notes seem reasonable. It doesn’t even include dictionary look-ups and as I’ve said I usually don’t highlight stuff that the dictionary elucidated. I think he difficulty level of this book is pretty similar to 엘리베이터에 낀 사람 by 김영하 which is also a collection of short stories by the same author. The number sounds right to me. For the elevator book, I only added stuff to anki for some of the short stories because I had the physical book and I only wanted looked up words for the short stories that I had found an electrical copy for since manually typing stuff is too labor intensive. Google works wonders 🙂 I could’ve taken pictures while reading and then run them through google keep for OCR then generate cards but I didn’t know about google keep’s capabilities back then.

무슨 일이 일어났는지는 아무도 – 김영하 (Highlight: 199; Note: 3)

───────────────

◆ 무슨 일이 일어났는지는 아무도

▪  SENTENCE I HIGHLIGHTED

▪ SENTENCE I HIGHLIGHTED

I wrote this because I like reading stuff on an ereader and NOT on a smartphone or a tablet or a computer screen due to the eye strain those devices cause. Although, I’m sure there are many great options for looking up words while reading Korean on the tablet/smartphone/computer screen.

My initial goal of getting a korean-english/korean-japanese/etc dictionary on the kindle working ended in futility since I didn’t succeed. However I got my answer of “no you can’t use a Korean-English dictionary kindle.” Just in case you’re curious, the English-Korean dictionary works perfectly on the kindle but I don’t need that! From this experience I learned how to convert dictionary files to STARDICT format (which enables me to use them for wordquery anki plugin and so now I have 5 dictionaries that I run through the wordquery plugin on anki for my Korean cards), I know how to convert tab delimited files to the kindle format though it’s pointless for Korean, and I found my holy grail Korean font as you can tell from the screenshot. This was tricky because I like reading Korean with hangeul and hanja together so the hanja can’t look hideous. Unfortunately I had to eliminate some fonts that were gorgeous in their hangeul letters but hideous in their kanji/hanja forms. There were some korean fonts that only had hangeul and no hanja so the hanja just became squares or blanks which shocked me. Also, I thought the hanja looked gorgeWZuzY0.md.jpgous on the UnGungseo font but for some reason the letters are spaced way too far apart so I can’t tell where the spaces between the words are since it looks like there’s a space between every syllable block. Unfortunately I couldn’t find a Korean font where the hanja looks gorgeous the way it does on ungunseo so I settled on 서울 font and 한겨레. I have a distinct disdain for straight Korean fonts which make me that much less motivated to read Korean and increase my anxiety. I must say that using a font I love in the ereader makes me that much more excited to read Korean but I’m sure the novelty will wear off .

I aptly titled this the best way to korean on an ereader since it’s the only way as far I know for us korean learners that do not live in korea. I’ve heard of this korean ereader crema that is overpriced, is slow/laggy, and only has korean-korean dictionary WHICH just doesn’t appeal to me since the android e-reader is much better.

 

 

 

 

Also, I unfortunately bought physical Korean books  a year or two ago.  I finished one or two of them and for one of them I kept writing in the kanji in the margins of the book because I hated and resented being forced to spend unnecessary energy to figure out the meaning of the words because they only write in hangeul (Sometimes I could clearly tell it’s hanja but I had no idea which one it is despite the context so I felt even more resentful). I can only imagine how much more fruitless and hopeless it would feel if I was illiterate in Japanese and knew nothing about hanja…. I think I’ll try to go back and finish reading them all after I read all my ebooks (about 30 or so). I’m sure it’ll be a breeze by that point.

Here are the dictionary files I used for goldendict + moon reader for anyone with android! I got 2 from lingoes (they had to be converted and that’s the edocu and the vicom one), and 3 from stardict. I edited 2 of them with stardict editor because there were no line breaks which makes reading the entries unnecessarily difficult.

MEDIAFIRE LINK

to break it down

vicom is korean-english (from lingoes)

edocu is korean-english ( from lingoes)

quick-eng-kor is korean-english

naver is korean-japanese

koreandic is korean-korean

ALSO! here is the link for all the stardict dictionaries that you can use on the FASTWORD QUERY OR  wordquery plugin.

MEDIAFIRE

There are 4 dictionaries in the korean-english dictionary folder. The other dictionaries are korean-korean, korean-japanese from naver, and hanja (all it does is insert all the homonyms). This brings the grand total to 7! I had to edit some of them with stardict editor because there were NO LINE BREAKS which makes the entries hard to read. The one titled github was converted from the tsv file on this github page

I like the quick korean-english dictionary because it’s so BRIEF and short. Of course my favorite is naver korean-japanese. If I’m desperate or I feel like it (if it’s the only field that’s filled from running query) I check out the korean-korean definition since reading Korean is labor intensive and fruitless at times (when you read it, or even re-read it and don’t understand what you read). There are 2 English dictionaries that generate a lot of text since they’re FULL of example sentences. They might be identical but I’m not sure so I just kept both.

Here’s another reddit link where someone mentioned using koreader on a kobo ereader to read korean.

 

 

 

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Korean 101: yet again

Previous installments: here and here

포스

AxG95i.md.pngI first came across this word on a Korean TV show that involved dancing, singing or rapping. I am certain that on Unpretty Rapstars someone was using that word to describe Jessie. I misunderstood 포스 for a long time because I never looked it up in English. I recall looking it up in Japanese and got the meaning of the word. I assumed that it came from POSE since I heard POSU. The Korean word is actually based on FORCE. When I read the meaning of the word I was peeved that they were forcefully imposing that meaning on top of the word “pose.” I must say digesting and remembering the meaning of POSU is easier after inputting the actual English root word. It reminds me of the time I thought style meant style in Japanese for the longest time since I never thought to look it up since I know English. However, it turned to actually mean body…. I wrote about it on lang-8 eons ago!

AxG4sC.md.pngAnother Korean-related snafu that I experienced was a ridiculously long sentence.

I was reading this blog entry about Produce 48 that was disguised as a news article. At the end of the article, they write this was from a blog or something that to that effect which sounded ridiculous to AxGVnm.md.pngme. While I was reading this mammoth of a blog entry/article, I came across a long sentence that I could not follow. I had no problem understanding the clauses but I could not connect them together and comprehend the sentence as a whole. I read it multiple times and kept getting lost at the same part lol. After reading someone’s English translation, stuff clicked in my head and I had no problem following and understanding the sentence in its entirety.

here is that sentence!
이에 일본을 대표하는 아이돌 그룹이 자신들의 떨어진 인기를 회복하기 위해, 한국 아이돌처럼 뛰어난 실력을 기르기 위해, 동시에 이를 바탕으로 혹시라도 케이팝의 시장인 더 넓은 세계에서도 이름을 알릴 기회를 얻을 수 있을지 모른다는 기대를 갖은 채 자신들을 참고삼아 만든 것이 분명한 한국 프로그램에 참여하는 재미있는 상황이 벌어지고 있는 것이다.

and click below for the translation/explanation. Also I learned that this Korean person made a mistake in his writing in this crazy long sentence.

Moving on, I learned about the nuance of bun-hada when I was reading about Produce 48 in Japanese.

I read the article a few weeks after the show wrapped and I admit that I completely missed the bun-hada commotion. I didn’t notice at all. On the show they mistranslated miyawaki sakura’s comment when she said kuyashii desu which I’ve heard at least a couple hundred times in my life at least just from KATOU the geinin. Apparently, a bunch of AxGqTo.md.pngkorean netizens starting hating on her from that mistranslation.  Apparently they’ve screwed over asada mao and other Japanese people with mistranslations. I understand Japanese so if anything when people speak Japanese on Produce48 I read the Korean to learn Korean or to see how they translated stuff. So of course I’m not gonna go outta my way to look words in a Korean translation of Japanese speech when I understand Japanese speech. If you want to read about that maelstrom  google 분하다 미야와키 사쿠라 or watch the youtube vids about it.  Now I know the nuance of bunhada~

AxGBO9.md.pngAdditionally, I learned about 야민정음 when I was reading produce 101 season 2 stuff and ran into 국끄 which obviously is not in the dictionary. I can just tell.

Here’s a copy paste of the explanation:

국끄 is a sort of 야민정음, an alternative alphabet of Korean mostly used in dcinside and other sister sites related with it. The main rule of creating 야민정음 is to replace hanguls with other similar-shaped hanguls. So the actual meaning of 국끄 is 국프, the abbreviation of 국민프로듀서.

The fans of 프로듀스101 call themselves 국프, following the original concept of the audition program, which asks viewers to pick a contestant and vote as producers. When you self-claim as a 강다니엘국끄, for example, what you are trying to say is that you’re a 강다니엘’s fan/supporter.

END OF PASTE

To be completely honest, I hate that shit and I will never use it. Nor will I ever misspell words on purpose in Korean when I write in Korean. Reading Hangeul is labor-intensive as it is since I can’t help but compare it to my reading experience in Japanese… I was livid when I saw them misspelling words on purpose on this Korean TV show on MNET. It was a combination of yamin-jung-eum, making shit cute, and just for shits and giggles. I wonder what percentage of the words were spelled correctly on that show?? It was ridiculous and I’m so glad I didn’t see it 2012/2011. I would’ve been wtf and wasting a lot of time with google and dictionary if I attempted to decode that.

AxGmc2.md.png(<__- lol Japanese idols)

Lastly, I found out that hoarders exist in Korea too! If you think about it hoarders exist wherever consumerism exists. To fill your computer/phone screen with disgusting images AxG3Zv.md.pngsearch 호더즈 or 저장강박증

I gotta check out all the videos on youtube. It’s fascinating to me.

HANJARO – Resource Recommendation

HANJARO | 漢字路  |  한자로

I recoAUKiEb.md.pngmmend this useful resource for Korean learners who know and can read Japanese or Chinese. This is a site that inserts Chinese characters into the Korean text you paste. For longer texts like ebooks you have to download their program and use it on hancom or microsoft office.

It gives the user various options to customize the rendering to his or her needs:

    • paste the text or paste the URL. I usually paste the text because I usually hate the formatting of the website.
    • replace the hangeul with hanja or place hanja next to the hanguel word
    • the option of choosing from Chinese characters used in Taiwan, China, Japan, or Korea.
    • when it places the hanja next to the hangeul it place parentheses around the hanja word so what I like doing is doing control + h and replace ( with space ( so I can use lingoes off-line dictionary since lingoes only processes exact matches for Korean (I double click for it to look up the word). Therefore lingoes is great at compensating the weakness of hanjaro which is that it only inserts one hanja that matches even if there are multiple homonyms. Lingoes offers k-j, k-e, and more ! ( I use K-J and K-e) Also, Hancom word processor has a k-k dictionary which works as a pop-up dictionary too! (however like lingoes the stuff has to be unconjugated and the kango words need to have a space from the verb etc) I do like how the dictionary searches as you type like Lingoes.   Unfortunately lingoes pop-up dictionary does NOT work on hancom word so I read the articles on notepad (the formatting on these Korean websites are terrible for reading) and I use lingoes pop-up dictionary then either look up the word using one of the authotkey shortcuts for opening a dictionary website with the word already inputted or use hancom dictionary (this dictionary doesn’t know how to unconjugate either. how pathetic! However when the window pops up you can type in the blue area to search lingoes dictionary).
    • WWXjK7.md.png
      WWXitb.md.png
    • I  have it set it on lingoes that if I hover over a word in the definition and press SHIFT, lingoes looks up that word! Also I only have the computer’s language set to Japanese because I can only set the computer language to Korean or Japanese because those are the only keyboards I have installed since it’s a pain to switch between keyboards if I have English, Korean and Japanese. also the korean keyboard includes English so it is redundant.  I prefer reading Japanese over Korean (I prefer English the most though! I’d rather read English than katakana which is the case with the computer) so I switched it to Japanese but now I’m considering changing it back to Korean because now hancom is full of gibberish since it can’t render Korean.
  • I use it when I generate Korean anki cards from readlang.com. I use the cloze deletion format so I put the text rendered by hanjaro on the back of the card instead of the original sentence to lower the barrier of reading. Also the sentences that I encounter via reading  tend to be dense with information.

Here’s an example of text that went through hanjaro. I chose hanja for the rendering

7일(日) 한 매체(媒體)는 ‘프로듀스 101’의 네 번째(番째) 시즌이 내년(來年) 4월(月) 방송(放送)을 목표(目標)로 제작(製作)을 준비(準備) 중(中)이라고 보도(報道)했다. 이에 대(對)해 Mnet 측(側)은 “새로운 시즌을 논의(論議) 중(中)이다. 하지만 편성(編成) 등(等) 자세(仔細)한 사항(事項)은 아직 확정(確定)된 부분(部分)이 없다”며 말을 아꼈다.

‘프로듀스 101’ 시리즈는 그동안 아이오아이, 워너원 등(等)을 탄생시켜 대중(大衆)들의 뜨거운 반응(反應)을 이끌어 냈다. 또한, 가장 최근(最近) 시즌인 ‘프로듀스 48’에서는 아이즈원까지 출범(出帆)시켰다.

I actually know and am already familiar with all the words in the article excerpt so I don’t need the hanja inserted but I definitely read faster with hanja than without.

Here’s the before:

7일 한 매체는 ‘프로듀스 101’의 네 번째 시즌이 내년 4월 방송을 목표로 제작을 준비 중이라고 보도했다. 이에 대해 Mnet 측은 “새로운 시즌을 논의 중이다. 하지만 편성 등 자세한 사항은 아직 확정된 부분이 없다”며 말을 아꼈다.

‘프로듀스 101’ 시리즈는 그동안 아이오아이, 워너원 등을 탄생시켜 대중들의 뜨거운 반응을 이끌어 냈다. 또한, 가장 최근 시즌인 ‘프로듀스 48’에서는 아이즈원까지 출범시켰다.

It has its limitations which primarily stems from the existence of homonyms that exist in Korean. However, that’s almost nonissue to me since I am very literate in Japanese and I’ve gotten fairly proficient in Korean from the time put I put into the language from the summer of 2011. It’s obvious to me when the hanja is wrong based on the context. I use the hanja as a visual aid to exert less effort and lower the burden while reading AUKrN0.md.pngand to read faster. The beauty of kanji and hanja is that I read its meaning automatically, without my volition, and instantaneously. If I had to quantify the amount of energy it takes to read hangeul for meaning it’d be 1 and for Japanese kanji it would 0.1 or 0.01. I am acutely aware of how labor-intensive reading Korean is compared to Japanese when it comes to reading for meaning. Hanja is a fantastic companion to hangeul for reading for lazy people like me who happens to know how to read Japanese. I use hanjaro for internet articles and korean ebooks. It makes reading Korean more pleasant for me even despite its limitations.

Now, I can finally put my foot down when it comes to adding hanja based words to anki. Sometimes I’d be almost mad at myself for not recognizing a hanja word that I already know since I know the Japanese equivalent and they sound sorta similar and/or I’ve already looked it up in the past. I get into this conundrum of should I put this into anki to make sure I don’t waste time looking it up if I don’t recognize the word in a future encounter even though it’s kind of a freebie since I know Japanese or should I not add it and hope I will be able to conjure up the word’s meaning next time I encounter it from having looked it up and just based on the hangeul and context. Now because of this site I will only add hanja-words to anki that are truly difficult or tricky to remember. After all, the korean korean words (ex 코딱지 and no that word is not in my anki deck) are hard to remember as it is and I want to focus my energy on those words as opposed to hanja-words I already know that I don’t recognize that hide behind the hangeul-mask.

I found the the site by googling in Korean or Japanese (I can’t remember) and I’m just kicking myself for not hAUK2V5.md.pngaving done it sooner. The thought popped in my head because I was reading about the pros and cons of writing in Korean in hangeul only vs writing korean in a mixed script of hangeul and hanja on this wiki website that was outlining all the points of contention between the 2 fierce groups. I was surprised to learn from that site that there are so many ways to propose mixing the hanja and hangeul in writing ie only write x type of words in Hanja. I never realized that there were so many ways to go about it. Anyway, I love this site because it enables me to take full advantage of Japanese proficiency.

I believe I will imprAUKg33.md.pngove my Korean faster through reading if I constantly reinforced the hanja words with the hanja next to them instead of seeing them veiled under hangeul and look them up manually over and over EVEN with authotkey scripts + gaming mouse. Before I knew about this site, I would waste my time looking up hanja words I already know but didn’t recognize because they were written in hangeul.

here’s an example of a hanja word that I couldn’t figure out from the hangeul and the context. It happened like a year ago or maybe years ago or months ago?? It’s the only example I can come up with right now because I’ve been loving the hanjaro site and I’ve gotten more literate (in sense of understanding what I’m reading as opposed to being able to read shit out loud) in Korean these past few years. Variations of this has happened to me so many times!

So, I read an article and it used the word 화재 a bunch of times and I said to myself it’s definitely not 화제 (hot topic) and nothing is coming to mind as to what kanji/hanja word it is (I just know that it is a noun and it’s definitely a kanji/hanja word). of course at the end I either looked it up or figured out its the korean version of kasai (Fire disaster). Without fail, I realize that I already looked up 화재 sometime before the second I learned what the meaning was (just seeing the hangeul is completely arbitrary to me). So at that point I had read the whole article not understanding what hajae was other than it was a noun and it’s based on hanja so obviously I missed out. At that point I decided to not re-read the article because it annoyed me immensely and I did not care about the article that much. When I use it, reading takes less effort, I read faster, and I don’t waste my time looking up words I pretty much know but have a low familiarity with. It’s a win win win situation.

Also sometime last year, I tried learning from Korean news through this Japanese site that provides korean news in Japanese with links to the original articles in KOrean. For a second I thought that having a Japanese translation would lower my apprehension and burden dramatically. It was a big fail because I don’t like reading about news about government/economics/etc especially when I don’t live in Korea… that stuff bores me. It’s like watching the weather segment of the Korean news except it’s 100 times harder to understand and I live in America. Also darting my eyes between hangeul and Japanese searching for the translation of the unknown word is a pain. More than anything the site made go why the hell would I read this in Korean when there is a Japanese translation with all that kanji since it’s so dense with sino-words written in hangeul.  I think this year I may try to learn from this site since now I have hanjaro added to my arsenal.  I will blog about it if I go through with it~ I’m thinking of setting low goals like 1 article a month etc.

I tried using the site for Korean subs to see if it would help me comprehend/readAUKAGT.md.pnging the subs faster but I found it incredibly distracting since hanja is traditional characters (there’s a lot of stuff going with one character lol). I tried with kanji just in case but it was still distracting since it’s not 100% correct. Not only that, it was subs to YG treasure box on V-LIVE (it is subbed in MANY languages) which is very easy to understand anyway. I love hearing the incorrect Korean from the Japanese people lol. They direct-translate like crazy and they always correct their Korean in the subs. I usually make anywhere from 2-5 anki cards per episode. It’s not as challenging as SMTM or talk shows for obvious reasons. I am better off with hangeul-only subs for this situation. BTW Viki has a lot of dramas with korean and english subs and you can download the subs!

On a related note, whAUK0Xr.md.pngenever I go through korean song lyrics if I think the artist or song is remotely popular I google the song title, artist and wayaku because it’s so much faster for me to go through the lyrics with that compared to me going at it with a dictionary and the korean lyrics. Also I generate anki cards so it would speed up the process.

Part of the reason I do that is because Korean requires interpretation skills that I don’t possess yet. I’ll read the lyrics and be confused or unsure as to what it means because they often leave out subjects. I’ll figure out all the ways something can be interpreted and then I’ll come to a decision and then later find out (through an english or japanese translation) that I was wrong in that none of my interpretations were right or the one that I thought was the least likely was correct. I believe I gain more by using wayaku and just getting the answer to the correct interpretation than wasting my time trying to figure out the interpretation every time I look up song lyrics to a song I like. It’s time I don’t have and I don’t believe this activity will help me grow my interpretation skills. I think I’ll eventually hone in on this skill once I spend enough time inputting comprehensible input.

Hanja compliments Hangeul because hanja makes the text easier to read by rendering the act more effortless. There’s an effortless quality that I attribute to reading Chinese characters compared to phonetic alphabet like English or Hangeul. It’s a quality that’s AUKZgF.md.pnghighly desired by lazy people like me (Of course I’ve experienced first-hand that learning to read and write 2000+ kanji takes more time and effort than learning how to read and write hangeul. I did like how it broke up the monotony of studying grammar. I enjoyed having variety in that I had the option of doing an acitivity to learn Japanese that involved a different part of my brain or a lower level of energy or so it seemed.). Of course, if you don’t know Japanese or Mandarin you may assume that phonetic alphabets are superior to logographic writing systems in every way. It seems a lot of Korean netizens always say that hangeul is acknowledged by scientists as the MOST brilliant, logical writing system and that Korea was able to abandon hanja (I think it’s great that they celebrate Sejong the Great but he didn’t invent hangeul with the intention of changing the writing system to hangeul-only and they kinda make it seem like he would support that even though there’s no evidence to support that. I hate it when people put words in other people’s mouth. ) while Japan has a crazy writing system which is a sign that they have a primitive writing system ( Of course that’s what some Japanese netizens say about hangeul) and China is spending too much time and energy learning all those characters. Statements like that only demonstrate their ignorance and close-mindedness. There are disadvantages and advantages to the 3 writing systems.

When I went into Korean knowing English and Japanese, I knew that no matter how much I read hangeul it’ll never feel as comfortable as reading Japanese as far as reading for meaning or speed (as in not reading it outloud) in terms of obtaining the meaning or exerting least amount of effort possible. The inherent nature of the hangeul writing system and its limitations are obvious to me. I think if it came down to which language I can read outloud fastest without taking comprehension into account it would come down to English and Korean of course but that defeats the point of reading which is to understand what you’re reading. Of course the downside to Japanese is that I have the dilemma of being unsure of theAUK8vz.md.png readings at times but I prefer knowing meaning over reading any day. I find not understanding the most “frustrating” part of sucking at language rather than not being able to read it out-loud. Reading hangeul is tiring. Reading Japanese is less tiring and takes less effort once you’re literate. As a lazy person, I’m glad I learned Japanese because of how effortless it can be to read stuff in Japanese at times. Every time I see a block of text in hangeul when I open online articles I feel a tinge of anxiety and ominous dread because I have a point of comparison. It’s the analogy of why would you go back to black and white when you can have all the colors  or why go back windows 95 when you have windows 10 (I can’t think of a good one). The point is I’ve experienAUKjH7.md.pngced the wonders of reading Japanese. It’s obvious to me that the Japanese writing system plays an integral role in the popularity of reading in Japan. Also it seems like everyone on TV has written a book. I’ve always cared about being able to understand a piece of writing more than being able to read it loud. Also, I’ve never had to waste time looking up words like MARTHA or 오르가슴 or VOLDEMORT (no i was not reading harry potter) since they write foreign words in Katakana meanwhile I’ve had that bitter experience many times with Korean since they only write in hangeul (in printed books they write foreign names and foreign words in a different font). That was one of the most demotivating characteristics of Korean with respect to learning it for me personally. I am very happy and blessed to have found this site.

Ultimately for words like KASAI/HWAJAE I prefer to sort it out by encountering it multiple times with the hanja next to it when I read rather than seeing in anki or looking it up over and over and over and over when I read. I believe in being as lazy as possible at times by not going against the current.  I don’t aspire to reach a point in Korean where I read hangeul-only texts  “fluently” with such ease that going through the rolodex of words to find the corresponding meaning only based on the context is imperceptible to my consciousness. I have no desire to strive to reach or reach the level where I read hangeul like a Korean native. It’s a pipe dream that I never had for Korean. I’ve come to the conclusion that I read much faster when hanja is haphazardly (it’s just not 100% correct) inserted into the hangeul text via hanjaro and I completely accept it and embrace it. This fact will never reverse unless somehow I become illiterate in Japanese which seems impossible to me. My conviction is rooted in my literacy in Japanese,  my understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of the Korean and Japanese writing systems that I gained first-hand, and also from reading about the topic in 3 languages. I can’t imagine not running text through HANJARO before reading when I can. To me, not running a text through hanjaro is equivalent to asking myself if I want to subject myself to the experience of reading a Japanese article or book that’s only written in hiragana. That is torture! Sometimes reading hangeul feels like reading Japanese that’s only written in hiragana if the percentage of the words I don’t know (or I do know but have low familiarity with) is high enough. It’s just that much more demotivating and irritating. I think for me, I would’ve NEVER EVER EVER EVER learned Korean to this level if I didn’t now Japanese. It’s just way too frustrating, inefficient, and stupid otherwise. Plus the Korean-Japanese Naver dictionary is a god-send. It just feels like a waste of my time reading hiragana/hangeul that has no meaning to me. Reading a text or a book full of unknown words in Japanese is a completely different experience from reading a text of book full of unknown words in Korean because it’s just that much more fruitless and painful in Korean. The same can be said about using a korean-korean dictionary and japanese-japanese dictionary. It is NIGHT AND DAY! (but even DESPITE this DISPARITY I still have one of my authotkeys set for daum korean korean dictionary because there are more entries for Korean-Korean dictionaries than the korean-english dictionaries and I hate not finding the word in the damn dictionary. I do this to lessen my chance of wasting my time. Although the Korean-Korean dictionary comes with the risk of me running into definitions full of words I don’t know to explain the word I looked up, I still prefer that to the dictionary finding NOTHING and wasting my time. By the way I usually do not look up words in the korean definitions of words… I don’t care about those words and more importantly I run the risk of looking up the words defining the words in the definition and on and on lol! It’s a matter of choosing the lesser of the 2 evils. It’s a real nightmare that I don’t have to deal with for Japanese since they have better dictionaries and write stuff in hiragana/katakana and kanji. Of course my go-to authotkey script is for google searching the word with IMI WA appended to it). For Japanese even if you don’t know the word, if it’s written in kanji you get something out of it and you have some obscure, vague idea of it (and you can even use pop-up dictionaries like rikai-sama, yomi-chan, etc. pop-up dictionaries exist for Korean but they suck compared to japanese ones) while in Korean you can waste a lot of energy trying to figure out the meaning solely based off the “sound” of the word (the fact there are homonyms and countless hanja that share the same pronunciation doesn’t help. this was exemplified by the KASAI/HWAJE example I mentioned.).

I’ve always felt super entitled as a person who knows Japanese that whenever I looked up hanja-based words that I already know that sound similar to Japanese or exist in Japanese I would feel irritated and mercilessly robbed of my my time and energy. Also I know about the history of the Japanese language and the Korean language ( I inadvertently learned about the influx of foreign words into Japanese during the Meiji Era when I was reading a book about Korean/Korea in Japanese. ) which makes me even more flummoxed to being subjected to reading hangeul-only text. Now I have no reason to feel that resentment when I read Korean on the internet or ebooks! I have a lot of articles and topics I’m interested in reading on the Korean internet and now I can finally hop to it. I hope to read more in 2019!

HERE are some articles I read so far: I like reading about people or topics that are of interest to me.

http://www.hankookilbo.com/News/Read/201605122062423406
http://www.pressian.com/news/article.html?no=69280#09T0

https://www.sisain.co.kr/?mod=news&act=articleView&idxno=26576 <-this was hard to follow at times. It was pretty bad. I didn’t understand the main points of the article. It was unclear to me and I had no motivation to re-read stuff to figure out the meaning of the sentence or phrases. I kinda gave up on this one. It’s too hard for me at my current level or I’m just too lazy to apply myself (no that’s a good thing because I gotta read what I’m really interested in) I think I’ll read an article about it in Japanese sometime in the future. I feel content with my expectations and my goals. I don’t need to kill myself AND read anything and everything in Korean. I have a choice to read about topics in English or Japanese instead just so I can satisfy my curiosity without having to spend ungodly amounts of time and effort. It’s just more fruitful and beneficial to focus on reading stuff in Korean that I really want to read in Korean. Enjoyment is VERY important and can never be tossed aside.

http://news.donga.com/Culture/more29/3/all/20141010/67068211/1

https://namu.wiki/w/%EC%9B%90%EC%A0%95%EB%85%80

https://www.sisain.co.kr/?mod=news&act=articleView&idxno=24942 <- about hanja

http://news.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2014/03/02/2014030202553.html

http://monthly.chosun.com/client/mdaily/daily_view.asp?idx=1998&Newsnumb=2017111998

https://theqoo.net/square/1043395792   < – seungri’s interview

 

 

 

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승리입니다 제가 이시점에서 연예계를 은퇴를하는것이 좋을거같습니다. 사회적 물의를 일으킨 사안이 너무나 커 연예계 은퇴를 결심했습니다 수사중인 사안에 있어서는 성실하게 조사를 받아 쌓인 모든 의혹을 밝히도록 하겠습니다. 지난 한달반동안 국민들로부터 질타받고 미움받고 지금 국내 모든 수사기관들이 저를 조사하고 있는 상황에서 국민역적 으로까지 몰리는 상황인데 저 하나 살자고 주변 모두에게 피해주는일은 도저히 제스스로가 용납이 안됩니다 지난 10여 년간 많은 사랑을 베풀어준 국내외 많은 팬분들께 모든 진심을 다해 감사드리며 와이지와 빅뱅 명예를 위해서라도 저는 여기까지인거같습니다 다시한번 죄송하고 또 죄송합니다 그동안 모든분들께 감사했습니다

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tiffany’s apology

티파니, 자필 사과문 게재 “부끄럽다..깊이 반성 중”(전문)

tiffany’s main apology
http://news.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2016/08/26/2016082602778.html

https://www.hangeul.or.kr/modules/bbs/index.php?code=bbs23&mode=view&id=12281&page=14&___M_ID=47&f_head=&sfield=&sword=

How I EFFICIENTLY learn Korean from reading

EDIT: 11/2018 – not sure when exactly it happened but I found a much more efficient way to go about this of course. It involves readlang.com and I will post it about it in the future if I feel like it. Also my 2016 post on learning korean with anki is also really inefficient compared to what I do now 🙂

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1) I don’t like staring at the computer

2) I’ve been at learning Japanese for like 8 years so I’ve been obsessed with efficiency as of late and have let go of stuff that just sucks up time but doesn’t make a big impact. In other words I’m optimizing my use of anki as much as possible.

3) my anki usage for Korean works because of my current level in Korean. I could not do this with Spanish fo sho.
I hate reading Korean sometimes. I only say this because I’m super used to reading Japanese and them Chinese characters. while for Korean words I know are hiding behind a mask until I look it up and go goddamnit that’s such a simple, obvious word. of course the upside to Korean is that it’s easier to type and look up stuff but then again sometimes trying to figure out the meaning that matches the word can be more of a pain in the ass compared to looking up a Japanese word with the Chinese characters in the word but that’s what chiebukuro and lang-8 are for when my analytical and critical thinking skills are lacking or when I don’t want to use them lol. that isn’t to say that my Korean reading is weak. I read fast because it’s inevitable with alphabets to get faster at reading them but alphabets don’t give me that effortless feel that I get when I read Japanese with the Chinese characters. the reading is automatic and effortless because the Chinese characters are so distinct looking.

4) I only read about topics that interest me. the generic advice of read news articles everyday is BULLSHIT. I’m sorry no one gives a shit about the news at least not as much as you unless you don’t even follow the advice you are saying. by the way the most important thing you need to notice is that the person who is spouting this nonsense is not even fluent in their target language. what is up with these assholes that are not even fluent giving advice that are shit.

5) I learn Korean using Japanese. once in a while I use Korean to learn Korean because I just got taken a site with Korean definitions instead of Japanese definitions when I clicked on a link in Google and I didn’t want to waste anymore time in Google since the definition made sense to me. ALSO I don’t have intentions of going monolingual dictionary at all. I don’t know if I’ll ever feel that way. for the most part I prefer to read Japanese because it’s more efficient because they use Chinese characters while Korean they don’t so you gotta really use your brain every f’in time and figure out which word they’re using based off the context at times (which is perfectly, fine, acceptable and effortless to Korean native speakers I’m sure. but I sure as hell am not subjecting myself to unnecessary mental somersaults)

the main reason I want to share this is for THE EFFICIENCY ASPECT. I hope to inspire people to stop being damn perfectionists because it will slow down the rate at which you learn the language. but seriously what is up with those people with the “language notebooks” it’s like their obsessed with their handwriting saying it looks ugly or pretty or improved. it’s like it’s inefficient.  IT’S SERIOUSLY ridiculously depressing how inefficient and ineffective the notebook stuff is especially if you handwrite all the definitions (even worse if you do example sentences from the dictionary or add the hanja) to the words you look up in a book or something and then NEVER Look at it again. talk about a time sink. i don’t know what possesses people to do this shit. it will not get you to fluency and it is not smart. i could never even get myself to do it because i see the futility in doing that like how will this serve me 5 years from now 10 years from now 6 months from now. these people are clearly not trying to become fluent or they refuse to see the errors in their ways in that there are better ways to go about it. clearly their goal is not fluency though they don’t seem to realize it.

First things first, I’ve been reading articles about hanja usage in Korean like mixed vs only hangeul and people’s thoughts on the advantages and disvatanges for both sides.

So I printed out a bunch of articles on my topic of interest. by a bunch I mean 180 pagesworth. I format that shit like boss on microsoft word! I went through half of it so far.

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What I do is

1) I read it and circle words/grammar/anything with a red pen.
2) Then on a later day I type in all the words/grammar whatever (not the whole sentence) in a notepad file (I don’t type whole sentences or paste the sentences/paragraphs because then I’m spending a lot of time searching for my single word that I don’t know on the right side of naver translator which makes this shit REALLY INEFFICIENT ). sometimes i do take the sentence or the clause but usually i don’t because it’s not worth it.
3) I paste that into naver translator and translate Korean to Japanese.

http://translate.naver.com/#/ko/en/

4) I read the sentence or the section of the article again with the definition in mind and finally comprehend the sentence/paragraph in its entirety. for the words where the TRANSLATOR fails me or I want a more detailed definition I just mark them to back to afterwards (put a star next it whatever **) because it’s more efficient that way. i mark that in the notepad rather than the naver because naver is finicky. also simplenote is probably better than notepad since it automatically saves but my computer has been rather stable lately so i’m not worried about stuff suddenly closing/crashing.

5) I look up the words in which the translator definition does not satisfy me on naver dictionary by searching all the words in the search bar. for example you can look up multiple words at the same time by putting spaces between them ie “겨워 대신”. You can do a lot like infinite??? but then it gets more difficult to read through so I usually do 5 words at most. I got really excited at this and I tried it on dic.yahoo.co.jp but it didn’t work 😦 but we have rikaisama for Japanese!

OR I use LINGOES dictionary WHICH HAS the korean/japanese naver dictinoary and it has the pop-up option. and i’ve configured it so that if I copy a korean word that is unknown the definition pops up in 30 pt font and I’m able to highlight the definition or multiple defintions and save them. Maybe I prefer this because there’s no internet required so there’s no lag involved.

6) for the stuff that fails naver translate I go to Google and do “word 意味は”” and then if that fails I ask on chiebukuro with a  ほにゃららってどういう意味ですか? and  the whole sentence or the whole paragraph if I need too. sometimes I go directly to chiebukuro (sometimes lang-8) after naver dic fails me because I don’t like wasting time and I have a feeling that Google will fail me. by the way I don’t have to ever do this for Japanese… it’s really rare. usually the Japanese dictionary has my back. but seriously why does the korean dictionary refuse to carry korean grammar stuff.
7) I paste the stuff I get from Google/chiebukruo/Japanese blog into notepad
8) AT THIS POINT after having reading the sentence with the definition I have deleted any words I do not want to learn for whatever reason ( useless/not interested/too easy/ too obscure/etc/etc). I delete the words on NOTEPAD and NOT naver translate because naver translate is finicky and I do not want to waste my time. so I usually repaste my modified list of words into naver translate.

ANYWAYS, I paste the stuff in the LEFT SIDE OF naver translate into EXCEL

9) I paste the stuff in the RIGHT SIDE OF naver translate into excel.
10) REPLACE OR ADD to the entries of the RIGHTSIDE of naver translate with the stuff I got from Google/chiebukuro/Japanese blog WITH if I’m adding. BY THE WAY I DO NOT OBSESS OVER getting PERFECT or complete definitions over every word because that is a waste of time. anki is a tool. it should not be your only contact with the language and you really can’t know a word until you encounter it multiple times in the wild. hence I do not stress over PERFECTING my anki cards (that is a waste of time after a certain point). I only do this stuff with Google/chiebukruo because the dictionary fails me.
11) I select column D and paste =CONCATENATE(A1,11,B1,22,A1)
12) I copy column d, paste into notepad and replace 11 with : and 22 with : using control + h … I’m gonna start doing a1,11,b1,11,a1 so I just replace 11. I used to do

instead of : for the part between the definition and the cloze deletion blank.
13) blank out the random syllable of the Korean word on the left side by using * to blank out all the parts then using control + h to replace that with ____ for my blanks
14) add tags: article on the top of the notepad file so that they’re ALL tagged with article
15) import into anki with the card specifically formatted with 3 fields for cloze deletion blank, definition, whole word or sentence (it’s not often but sometimes I do get the whole sentence or phrase). that way I can edit card type/format whatever so that I get cloze deletion blank definition on the front and whole word on the back.

I feel very content that I’m able to go about it in an efficient way. Because of this I’ve been able to add like anywhere from 20-50 words to anki per week because I work full time and I like to do stuff I enjoy and minimize my use of anki. My expectations are that I won’t really notice much of a benefit from doing this until I add a few thousand words just because I’m not at that sweet intermediate stage where everyday you feel like you improve so much. Right now I’m at a point where I know the majority of the commonly used words which enables me to notice the less commonly used words and also allows those words leave more of an impression on my mind. This is just my assessment of my current situation with Korean based on my experience with Japanese. THe UPSIDE to this upper stage compared to the intermediate is that I will notice improvement from ignoring Korean/not doing stuff in korean. By that I will go weeks without watching/doing something in Korean then watch something or read something and I feel like my korean is somehow better in that certain concepts or words or whatever just makes more sense or is more automatically processed then before. the reason is there’s a digestion/processing thing that happens while i’m not even doing shit in that language. it’s a subconscious thing.  steve kaufman touched on this specific observation in language learning but i don’t know which youtube video it was.

Just sharing because I’ve been  learning Japanese for long and though I cannot take back all the time I “wasted” by doing stuff inefficiently etc I can learn from that and figure out ways to make stuff efficient from here on what. also i try not to think about it because it’s too depressing lol. by the way for japanese i use rikai-sama, excel, capture2text, microsoft word (holy shit control +h for ^p is MIND BLOWING!and i wish i knew about it sooner ), transcripts of japanese tv i linked on the side to be more efficient about it.

if you’re confused about my anki format here is an entry

https://choronghi.wordpress.com/2016/11/24/how-i-learn-korean-with-anki/

if somehow you can think of ways to optimize this process even more let me know. as far as I know there isn’t because there’s no pop-up korean dictionaries that’ll enable me to do this and this is the most efficient way to look up words.

I will post my KOREAN 101 post when I gather up a few more words that make me go why the hell don’t I know this yet.

Interesting Korean Article with AUDIO

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They have the whole transcript of the audio!! It’s a goldmine for language learners. For me with my current level of Korean it doesn’t really matter if I have the audio or not but nonetheless I will definitely listen to this once I read this article and look up all the words. Plus I’m curious how calm and collected and composed everyone will be since sometimes debates get heated. One of my favorite things I love watching/listening to Japanese is people debating about something heatedly and the atmosphere gets tense and people start talking even faster and interrupt each other and start saying things that are kinda mean but in keigo etc etc lol… it’s just great entertainment and great for my Japanese learning.

The link to the interview is below. The topic is writing Korean using only hangeul VS writing Korean with hangeul and hanja mixed together. That’s a topic that’s really been of interest to me as as person who is learning Korean after Japanese (I’m still learning Japanese but  I am just saying it like this because I recommend learning one language at a time. I absolutely don’t see the point of learning 2 languages from scratch at the same time unless you love being inefficient!!! ). I’ve been able to find interesting articles to satisfy my curiosity in Japanese but there are articles that aren’t translated into Japanese for obvious reasons so I just had to read the Korean articles and discussions. This is the only one I found with audio so I felt that it was my duty as a fellow Korean learner to share in case anyone else finds this topic interesting. I personally have printed a lot of articles including this one to read… I’ve been looking up stuff using naver translate because that enables to generate anki cards in MCD format EFFICIENTLY.

http://www.nocutnews.co.kr/news/4590668#csidxd4064261da1b001b5a4543e4f382073 

87quBT.md.jpgI will paste one little excerpt from this interview-y thing that totally resonated with me.

그러면 한 가지 예만 듭시다. 어휘력이 상당히 떨어져서 상당히 외래어를 많이 쓰는데 제가 아주 답답하고 불쾌한 것은요. 바로 어제께도 뉴스에서 어떤 문제가 나오면 이슈라는 말 잘 써요. 당면문제, 시급한 현안 해도 될 것인데. 그 다음에 TF팀을 구성한다 그럽니다. TF라고 하는 걸 태스크포스라고 좀 더 분명하게 말하는 경우도 있는데 그것은 특별전담부서라고 하면 됩니다. 그러니까 점잖은 우리 말이 있는데도 불구하고 자꾸 외래어를 쓰고 하는 거는 우리말이 황폐화하고 있다는 증거예요.

원문보기:
http://www.nocutnews.co.kr/news/4590668#csidx0384ba9ef7c53588abf9a061eb1621c

There are some foreign words they use in Korean that I absolutely despise and “issue” is one of them! If I ever write in Korean and need to say issue I will definitely use one of the other words he suggested. BTW I wrote my very first lang-8 entry in Korean earlier this year out of necessity. I just had to ask for suggestions and of course nobody answered. I didn’t make much mistakes but the person was fixing all the spacing errors since I didn’t space anything lol.

I feel progress in my KOREAN comprehension abilities

1. 1000 words I’ve looked up on naver since not sure… (I don’t think it keeps track of any word I’ve ever looked up)

Legal.High.E05.720p.HDTV.x264.AAC-YYeTs[21-07-43 . huihui lollzlzlzlkj

holy moly it turns out that I had looked up a 1000 words on my NAVER Korean to Japanese app on my iphone. This discovery prompted me to write this entry. So I pretty much only use this app when I watch Korean TV via my computer and by Korean TV only specific TV shows that interest me since 90% of Korean TV just bores me to death (but you know what I could say that about American TV due to sheer volume of TV but they American TV have some good dramas). I find that to be astounding because I really do not watch that much Korean TV compared to Japanese TV. the only Korean shows I watch are show me the money and unpretty rapstar and sporadic episodes of talk/variety shows only if a Korean celebrity I care about is on it (lately I’ve been into watching gypo/foreigners – not the beauty suda show though… ) . it must have been over the course of the year… if I had to take a stab at it … in one ep of unpretty rapstar I could look up anywhere from 10 to 30 words just because I usually need to do that with rap lyrics.

ANYWAYS that number is mind-boggling and it just goes to show you every little thing really adds up especially if you use a srs or gold-list method etc.

2) I had recently decided to take a stab at spanish again. here are the reasons why : I learned spanish FROM MIDDLE SCHOOL TO HIGH SCHOOL ( which is about 6 years) and got straight A’s but I suck it and I think I wanna finish what I started, I live in America (so unlike Japanese I’ll actually hear it incidentally going grocery shopping etc… for Japanese if I was super lucky on a given day there will be 2 Japanese people chatting next to me on a NYC train), it’s similar to English (which means it would be that much more motivating and EASY… though I must say they are STILL different languages so it requires serious adjustment to tune my brain to spanish way of thinking)… and I thought due to similarities with English perhaps it would be strategically more smart to go heavy on immersion vs. learning grammar/useful vocab and so in that process I attempted reading a book in spanish. for most spanish learners reading is easier than listening comprehension… I thought it’s similar to English so I should be able to figure it out but damn it’s still hard due to vocab that is uniquely spanish vocab and have no resemblance to the English counterpart and the spanish grammar. I’m not used to spanish grammar so it’s tiring trying to follow what’s going on since my way of thinking is only comfortable in the English, Japanese, or Korea way (I tend to just read it but not actually process IT since it’s written in an alphabet like English. so I guess reading spanish like reading unknown English words though I TRY TO READ IT WITH the CORRECT spanish pronunciation AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE). SO I MENTION THIS because although spanish is SOOOOOOOOO similar to English due to my lack of time spent with spanish it’s pretty damn hard… but I find Japanese so easy and fun to read due to all the time I spent with it. So my shoddy spanish comprehension just shows me just how “good” my Korean/Japanese are.

3) I am adding cards in MCD format and modifying old cards to MCD format. I wasn’t not able to do this before because korena was just not familiar… it truly would be draining and ineffective. So there are cards I am converting to the mcd format so i can FINALLY LEANR THAT WORD. i have so many words that i see it and have no idea what the fuck it means. it doesn’t matter how long it’s been in my deck since I TRULY TRULY half ass my Korean deck because I just don’t give a shit so there will be cards in there from 2 years ago where I’ll take a look and have no f’in clue what it means. so if my retention rate for my Japanese deck is 90% then my Korean deck would be like 40/30/ or 50 % just because I don’t give a shit… I don’t use my Korean deck for srs in the sense that I could never remember the cards but still plow through picking 2’s and 3’s just because I know there’s no point drilling them. The MCD format that I a m currently employing involves BLANKING OUT the Korean part or the Japanese/definition part. for the Korean part I choose the most obvious or easy to remember syllable so anything with a BACCHIM is usually a hell no unless I’M REALLY FEELING THAT BACCHIM to mean what it means.

*** 새치___하다
取り澄ましている;おとなしいふりをする

back:
름 何食わぬ顔をする;そしらぬふりをする。

front:
___프다
//長持ちしない;減り方が早い;もろい。
back:
헤 しまりがない;不経済である。

front:
유___을 떨고

変わっている
back:
난 // 言行や状態が普通と全く違う[こと; 並外れなこと; 際立っていること; 気難しいこと; …にやかましいこと.

front:
__결같은 내 태도</
**처음부터 끝까지 변함없이

back:
한/ 처음부터 끝까지 변함없이 꼭 같다.한결같은 태도한결같은 마음둘 사이가 10년이

front:
「짤___」自体が造語で、「写真」、「動画」の事を指すようです(※詳細が分かりませんでした)。
back: 방

front:
회사빨 ___까 이제는
** 좆까(fuck you
back:
조/// 좆까(fuck you)を発音通りに書いた、좆까の遠回しの一つです。

front:
소재가 없으면 꼰____가 되나 봐 그렇지
素材がなければ****年老いたやつら
back:
대///先生になるみたい そうだ

꼰대は年上の人や父親を意味します。
少しニュアンスは違いますが、***老害的な…。ネガティブなあまり良い言葉ではないと思います。

そこに 行い を表す 질 と ~に の 에 がついています。

なので、全部合わせて

꼰대질에 썩은 웃음
大人の行いに腐った笑い

という感じの意味です。

front:
____상」とは無知からであれ故意であれ人に___惑をかける様またはそういう人を言います。
back:
진 // 迷

Like I said I don’t actually do my deck so I read the MINIMUM amount.

basically I would never ever remember any of these cards if it weren’t for the MCD FORMAT.

4) A Korean book I tried to read/learn from years ago… I’m going to guess 2011 or 2012…. I think I made index cards out of them to do manual srs or just said f’it and scrapped the whole thing

IMG_1106

IMG_1107

image url

just for the competitive bastards who might be reading my blog here are a couple words off those pages that I do not know. it doesn’t bother me one bit. as far as I know in this point in time those words are useless. I love that I have this attitude towards Korean because sometimes my attitude towards Japanese was too much…. learning to let go is very important. if it’s that important it will show up again. but if you’re trying to become super fluent you gotta realllllllly go after the intensity and the duration to learn a lot in a short period of time. I don’t have that desire with Korean because I already achieved it before lol. that is super demotivating. I strive for efficiency!

촘촘
움츠리다
산기슭 know it has to do with mountains but don’t know the actual meaning… perhaps mountain range?
반길질

수꿩

짝짓시
용암 actually I think I know this word…. due to my knowledge of the kango reading conversion from Japanese to Korean. it’s mostly like YOUGAN in Japanese.

some of these words may actually be in my srs (probably from adding them from another source besides this book) but I have no idea because I don’t really take my Korea srs like ido with my Japanese

Looking at these underlined pages (in pencil) now I will say that I still do not know all these words but now I actually do know some of the words…. by know I am very familiar with them. HOWEVER unlike Japanese where I had a burning desire and motivation to learn like all the words to get super fluent I had and still have a don’t give a shit attitude towards Korean (I don’t have a desire to get fluent). So my attitude towards the words that I still do not know from these pages is that the words are probably really useless. By useless I mean… I haven’t encountered them recently and they’re being used in this short story so these words are probably not of interest to me. the words I’m interested in learning in Korean are words that I find useful and actually encounter ( to ensure I’ll actually remember/retain the information because other wise it’s a WASTE OF TIME) . I think as language learners we should be as picky as we what want to learn when it comes to learning words. do whatever you need to do make it enjoyable or bearable etc. delete those SRS cards that just suck. another reason I don’t even interest is I have more interest in learning Korean words or grammar or phrases in rap songs because those tend to have the latest slang and offensive terms that I should KNOW! lol. smtm and uprs! I’ve mentioned this before that I hate reading Korean because I’d rather read Japanese or English because Japanese has kanji and English is such a useful language (they just both have more going on in the book industry and I just cannot stand reading Hangeul).

here is the mediafire .rar of the pictures files in case postimage.org craps out like imageshack.org

http://www.mediafire.com/download/2j88cv6ad5a9z27/korean-book%282%29.zip

this is actually 2 numbers because besides having this awesome attitude… I actually know most of the words that are underlined!!! There’s nothing like looking at something that’s super difficult and tedious now seeming less ridiculous and more appropriate for your learnig level. BUT even though the book is now at my level i won’t bother reading it because I don’t want to read it. As good as it feels knowing I know all these underlined words after 4 years when it comes down to it I have no desire to read this book. Like I read english books but I don’t just read anythig, same with japanese and the same with Korean but I really don’t like reading korean.

Like I’ve said in other blog entries despite what people may think heritage language learners have it tough too I that despite what “advantages’ you think they have it’s very possible that they suck. and I personally don’t believe anyone should be obligated to learn their heritage language… people can learn whatever language they want to. So here are some EXAMPLES I can remember since once you get better at something you forget the struggles and whatnot (though I have not reached this point in Korean, only with Japanese).

Before I started learning Korean which I started after learning Japanese I did not know common, useful, easy words such as
심하다
상처
초등 in 초등학생
at that time as far I knew they weren’t common lol.

OMG here comes the clincher. AN EXCELLENT EXAMPLE of something that i probably understood but I would’ve never been able to produce myself. this is something that every heritage learner probably says….

that infamous line we all have to say at one point” I can’t speak korean”

so if you asked 2012 me pre-korean learning how do you say that… I would’ve said

한국말 못해요. I think that’s fine and dandy and really emphasizes that you really suck at korean but the better grammar construction is 한국말할줄몰라요. forget the damn particles, you’re just speaking and if the person understands you it’s fine.

But in all seriousness if somebody asked me that and I wanted to answer with I don’t speak Korean I would say it in English so it’s a nonissue for me. lol…. but just wanted to give an example.

there’s may be more but I can’t conjure them up since it’s very difficult trying to remember something that you used to be unfamiliar with that you’re now familiar with.

here are some words that I consider REALLY easy that I added back in 2012 January
다정
예의
버섯
looking at it actually most of the words are still hard lol…. probably more familiar than they were in 2012

5) I only try to learn real Korean lol. like I said before I have to use a lot of Google and chiebukuro because stuff I look up are NOT in the dictionary. likewise lately for Japanese I’ve been looking up 誤植 in Google, find nothing, ask on chiebukuro ad have Japanese people tell me that must be a typo or somebody made that shit up.. did you mean to type this? seriously it’s gotten to this point lol….

there have been so many times with Korean where I would’ve never figured it out had I not asked on chiebukuro. it’s just one of those things where only native speakers know it and can explain it. but seriously BEFORE I even embarked on my language learnig journey I had an instinctual conviction that korean is going to be harder than Japanese and this is one the ways that KOREAN is so damn cumbersome. for japanese i don’t have to ask on chiebukuro to the extent I do with korean to the extent i do with korean since google just PLAIN works.

5) blame Korean people for not being able to understand.
lol how arrogant?? you may think. it applies to instances where I cannot understand the person for speaking unclearly. for example if a rapper has poor diction I may not be able to understand them…. or maybe their diction is just okay… but as a rapper your goal is to be clear as possible so people understand you since you worked so hard to write those lyrics down. here’s an example for English speakers… do you understand Adriana Grande when she sings… your answer is probably sometimes unless you memorized your lyrics and force yourself to hear for the words. she has poor diction. there’s no fucking way me not understanding her has to do with my English abilities. here’s another example can you understand chingy when he speaks English lol…. j/k but seriously wtf is wrong rappers like him who can’t speak English.

for Korean TV for some reasons 2 of the “top” mcs are hard to understand cause they don’t speak standard Korean. one of them looks like zakiyama and speaks in the intonation of this dialect and it sounds so noisy and unpleasant. I don’t even want to understand what the bastard is saying because it’s that ear-grating ad I know Korean mc’s compare to Japanese ones…. it’s a natural result since the owarai thing is so big in Japan. in an episode of happy together all the foreigners were like I can’t understand that bastard and I had to translate what he saying into my native language for some TV show. I don’t know what’s up with the other mc but he’s damn grating too. STENTORIAN!! Just throwing that in there because like I said in another entry I don’t want to sound like Kim kardashian when I turn 30! but seriously I hate it when people on Korean TV shows get super loud to say the most boring pointless shit. stfu…

6) not relevant to this topic exactly but I wanted to touch on that annoying question how long does it take to get fluent in x or what’s the shortest possible amount of time. So like I said I am not fluent in Korean. There are too many fucking words in korean that I don’t know including probably the majority of the curse words. I was thinkng I started 2012 but I never gave too much of a shit and most of my time is dedicated to japanese

but even then I still improved significantly considering 4 years is a long time. Slowly but surely there was improvement. I’m at a point where I can abuse Mcd and drill 50 words a day and succeed if I really wanted to ( which I totally did did with japanese) . It just would not have been possible in 2012 and once you learn a language you know when is the right time to be drilling any and all unknown words you come across because you know you can remember that because you have this huge repertoire of words you already know and a strong familiarity with the language. But I don’t want to do that because I just don’t care like that. 🙂

So if you want to be fluent in 2 years etc you gotta akatt and engage with the media

That’s about it. Can say much more but I have a life.

Previous Post

Thank you! this is some exicting development though this really isn’t since the entry is from JULY.

so this might/probably be better than lingoes!!! It has monolingual, and you don’t have to isolate the noun, maybe for the verb you still have to unconjugate which is understandable.

I hope it’ll make learning from song lyrics/drama lines more EFFICIENT