Category Archives: resources

HANJARO – Resource Recommendation

HANJARO | 漢字路  |  한자로

I recoAUKiEb.md.pngmmend this useful resource for Korean learners who know and can read Japanese or Chinese. This is a site that inserts Chinese characters into the Korean text you paste. For longer texts like ebooks you have to download their program and use it on hancom or microsoft office.

It gives the user various options to customize the rendering to his or her needs:

    • paste the text or paste the URL. I usually paste the text because I usually hate the formatting of the website.
    • replace the hangeul with hanja or place hanja next to the hanguel word
    • the option of choosing from Chinese characters used in Taiwan, China, Japan, or Korea.
    • when it places the hanja next to the hangeul it place parentheses around the hanja word so what I like doing is doing control + h and replace ( with space ( so I can use lingoes off-line dictionary since lingoes only processes exact matches for Korean (I double click for it to look up the word). Therefore lingoes is great at compensating the weakness of hanjaro which is that it only inserts one hanja that matches even if there are multiple homonyms. Lingoes offers k-j, k-e, and more ! ( I use K-J and K-e) Also, Hancom word processor has a k-k dictionary which works as a pop-up dictionary too! (however like lingoes the stuff has to be unconjugated and the kango words need to have a space from the verb etc) I do like how the dictionary searches as you type like Lingoes.   Unfortunately lingoes pop-up dictionary does NOT work on hancom word so I read the articles on notepad (the formatting on these Korean websites are terrible for reading) and I use lingoes pop-up dictionary then either look up the word using one of the authotkey shortcuts for opening a dictionary website with the word already inputted or use hancom dictionary (this dictionary doesn’t know how to unconjugate either. how pathetic! However when the window pops up you can type in the blue area to search lingoes dictionary).
    • WWXjK7.md.png
      WWXitb.md.png
    • I  have it set it on lingoes that if I hover over a word in the definition and press SHIFT, lingoes looks up that word! Also I only have the computer’s language set to Japanese because I can only set the computer language to Korean or Japanese because those are the only keyboards I have installed since it’s a pain to switch between keyboards if I have English, Korean and Japanese. also the korean keyboard includes English so it is redundant.  I prefer reading Japanese over Korean (I prefer English the most though! I’d rather read English than katakana which is the case with the computer) so I switched it to Japanese but now I’m considering changing it back to Korean because now hancom is full of gibberish since it can’t render Korean.
  • I use it when I generate Korean anki cards from readlang.com. I use the cloze deletion format so I put the text rendered by hanjaro on the back of the card instead of the original sentence to lower the barrier of reading. Also the sentences that I encounter via reading  tend to be dense with information.

Here’s an example of text that went through hanjaro. I chose hanja for the rendering

7일(日) 한 매체(媒體)는 ‘프로듀스 101’의 네 번째(番째) 시즌이 내년(來年) 4월(月) 방송(放送)을 목표(目標)로 제작(製作)을 준비(準備) 중(中)이라고 보도(報道)했다. 이에 대(對)해 Mnet 측(側)은 “새로운 시즌을 논의(論議) 중(中)이다. 하지만 편성(編成) 등(等) 자세(仔細)한 사항(事項)은 아직 확정(確定)된 부분(部分)이 없다”며 말을 아꼈다.

‘프로듀스 101’ 시리즈는 그동안 아이오아이, 워너원 등(等)을 탄생시켜 대중(大衆)들의 뜨거운 반응(反應)을 이끌어 냈다. 또한, 가장 최근(最近) 시즌인 ‘프로듀스 48’에서는 아이즈원까지 출범(出帆)시켰다.

I actually know and am already familiar with all the words in the article excerpt so I don’t need the hanja inserted but I definitely read faster with hanja than without.

Here’s the before:

7일 한 매체는 ‘프로듀스 101’의 네 번째 시즌이 내년 4월 방송을 목표로 제작을 준비 중이라고 보도했다. 이에 대해 Mnet 측은 “새로운 시즌을 논의 중이다. 하지만 편성 등 자세한 사항은 아직 확정된 부분이 없다”며 말을 아꼈다.

‘프로듀스 101’ 시리즈는 그동안 아이오아이, 워너원 등을 탄생시켜 대중들의 뜨거운 반응을 이끌어 냈다. 또한, 가장 최근 시즌인 ‘프로듀스 48’에서는 아이즈원까지 출범시켰다.

It has its limitations which primarily stems from the existence of homonyms that exist in Korean. However, that’s almost nonissue to me since I am very literate in Japanese and I’ve gotten fairly proficient in Korean from the time put I put into the language from the summer of 2011. It’s obvious to me when the hanja is wrong based on the context. I use the hanja as a visual aid to exert less effort and lower the burden while reading AUKrN0.md.pngand to read faster. The beauty of kanji and hanja is that I read its meaning automatically, without my volition, and instantaneously. If I had to quantify the amount of energy it takes to read hangeul for meaning it’d be 1 and for Japanese kanji it would 0.1 or 0.01. I am acutely aware of how labor-intensive reading Korean is compared to Japanese when it comes to reading for meaning. Hanja is a fantastic companion to hangeul for reading for lazy people like me who happens to know how to read Japanese. I use hanjaro for internet articles and korean ebooks. It makes reading Korean more pleasant for me even despite its limitations.

Now, I can finally put my foot down when it comes to adding hanja based words to anki. Sometimes I’d be almost mad at myself for not recognizing a hanja word that I already know since I know the Japanese equivalent and they sound sorta similar and/or I’ve already looked it up in the past. I get into this conundrum of should I put this into anki to make sure I don’t waste time looking it up if I don’t recognize the word in a future encounter even though it’s kind of a freebie since I know Japanese or should I not add it and hope I will be able to conjure up the word’s meaning next time I encounter it from having looked it up and just based on the hangeul and context. Now because of this site I will only add hanja-words to anki that are truly difficult or tricky to remember. After all, the korean korean words (ex 코딱지 and no that word is not in my anki deck) are hard to remember as it is and I want to focus my energy on those words as opposed to hanja-words I already know that I don’t recognize that hide behind the hangeul-mask.

I found the the site by googling in Korean or Japanese (I can’t remember) and I’m just kicking myself for not hAUK2V5.md.pngaving done it sooner. The thought popped in my head because I was reading about the pros and cons of writing in Korean in hangeul only vs writing korean in a mixed script of hangeul and hanja on this wiki website that was outlining all the points of contention between the 2 fierce groups. I was surprised to learn from that site that there are so many ways to propose mixing the hanja and hangeul in writing ie only write x type of words in Hanja. I never realized that there were so many ways to go about it. Anyway, I love this site because it enables me to take full advantage of Japanese proficiency.

I believe I will imprAUKg33.md.pngove my Korean faster through reading if I constantly reinforced the hanja words with the hanja next to them instead of seeing them veiled under hangeul and look them up manually over and over EVEN with authotkey scripts + gaming mouse. Before I knew about this site, I would waste my time looking up hanja words I already know but didn’t recognize because they were written in hangeul.

here’s an example of a hanja word that I couldn’t figure out from the hangeul and the context. It happened like a year ago or maybe years ago or months ago?? It’s the only example I can come up with right now because I’ve been loving the hanjaro site and I’ve gotten more literate (in sense of understanding what I’m reading as opposed to being able to read shit out loud) in Korean these past few years. Variations of this has happened to me so many times!

So, I read an article and it used the word 화재 a bunch of times and I said to myself it’s definitely not 화제 (hot topic) and nothing is coming to mind as to what kanji/hanja word it is (I just know that it is a noun and it’s definitely a kanji/hanja word). of course at the end I either looked it up or figured out its the korean version of kasai (Fire disaster). Without fail, I realize that I already looked up 화재 sometime before the second I learned what the meaning was (just seeing the hangeul is completely arbitrary to me). So at that point I had read the whole article not understanding what hajae was other than it was a noun and it’s based on hanja so obviously I missed out. At that point I decided to not re-read the article because it annoyed me immensely and I did not care about the article that much. When I use it, reading takes less effort, I read faster, and I don’t waste my time looking up words I pretty much know but have a low familiarity with. It’s a win win win situation.

Also sometime last year, I tried learning from Korean news through this Japanese site that provides korean news in Japanese with links to the original articles in KOrean. For a second I thought that having a Japanese translation would lower my apprehension and burden dramatically. It was a big fail because I don’t like reading about news about government/economics/etc especially when I don’t live in Korea… that stuff bores me. It’s like watching the weather segment of the Korean news except it’s 100 times harder to understand and I live in America. Also darting my eyes between hangeul and Japanese searching for the translation of the unknown word is a pain. More than anything the site made go why the hell would I read this in Korean when there is a Japanese translation with all that kanji since it’s so dense with sino-words written in hangeul.  I think this year I may try to learn from this site since now I have hanjaro added to my arsenal.  I will blog about it if I go through with it~ I’m thinking of setting low goals like 1 article a month etc.

I tried using the site for Korean subs to see if it would help me comprehend/readAUKAGT.md.pnging the subs faster but I found it incredibly distracting since hanja is traditional characters (there’s a lot of stuff going with one character lol). I tried with kanji just in case but it was still distracting since it’s not 100% correct. Not only that, it was subs to YG treasure box on V-LIVE (it is subbed in MANY languages) which is very easy to understand anyway. I love hearing the incorrect Korean from the Japanese people lol. They direct-translate like crazy and they always correct their Korean in the subs. I usually make anywhere from 2-5 anki cards per episode. It’s not as challenging as SMTM or talk shows for obvious reasons. I am better off with hangeul-only subs for this situation. BTW Viki has a lot of dramas with korean and english subs and you can download the subs!

On a related note, whAUK0Xr.md.pngenever I go through korean song lyrics if I think the artist or song is remotely popular I google the song title, artist and wayaku because it’s so much faster for me to go through the lyrics with that compared to me going at it with a dictionary and the korean lyrics. Also I generate anki cards so it would speed up the process.

Part of the reason I do that is because Korean requires interpretation skills that I don’t possess yet. I’ll read the lyrics and be confused or unsure as to what it means because they often leave out subjects. I’ll figure out all the ways something can be interpreted and then I’ll come to a decision and then later find out (through an english or japanese translation) that I was wrong in that none of my interpretations were right or the one that I thought was the least likely was correct. I believe I gain more by using wayaku and just getting the answer to the correct interpretation than wasting my time trying to figure out the interpretation every time I look up song lyrics to a song I like. It’s time I don’t have and I don’t believe this activity will help me grow my interpretation skills. I think I’ll eventually hone in on this skill once I spend enough time inputting comprehensible input.

Hanja compliments Hangeul because hanja makes the text easier to read by rendering the act more effortless. There’s an effortless quality that I attribute to reading Chinese characters compared to phonetic alphabet like English or Hangeul. It’s a quality that’s AUKZgF.md.pnghighly desired by lazy people like me (Of course I’ve experienced first-hand that learning to read and write 2000+ kanji takes more time and effort than learning how to read and write hangeul. I did like how it broke up the monotony of studying grammar. I enjoyed having variety in that I had the option of doing an acitivity to learn Japanese that involved a different part of my brain or a lower level of energy or so it seemed.). Of course, if you don’t know Japanese or Mandarin you may assume that phonetic alphabets are superior to logographic writing systems in every way. It seems a lot of Korean netizens always say that hangeul is acknowledged by scientists as the MOST brilliant, logical writing system and that Korea was able to abandon hanja (I think it’s great that they celebrate Sejong the Great but he didn’t invent hangeul with the intention of changing the writing system to hangeul-only and they kinda make it seem like he would support that even though there’s no evidence to support that. I hate it when people put words in other people’s mouth. ) while Japan has a crazy writing system which is a sign that they have a primitive writing system ( Of course that’s what some Japanese netizens say about hangeul) and China is spending too much time and energy learning all those characters. Statements like that only demonstrate their ignorance and close-mindedness. There are disadvantages and advantages to the 3 writing systems.

When I went into Korean knowing English and Japanese, I knew that no matter how much I read hangeul it’ll never feel as comfortable as reading Japanese as far as reading for meaning or speed (as in not reading it outloud) in terms of obtaining the meaning or exerting least amount of effort possible. The inherent nature of the hangeul writing system and its limitations are obvious to me. I think if it came down to which language I can read outloud fastest without taking comprehension into account it would come down to English and Korean of course but that defeats the point of reading which is to understand what you’re reading. Of course the downside to Japanese is that I have the dilemma of being unsure of theAUK8vz.md.png readings at times but I prefer knowing meaning over reading any day. I find not understanding the most “frustrating” part of sucking at language rather than not being able to read it out-loud. Reading hangeul is tiring. Reading Japanese is less tiring and takes less effort once you’re literate. As a lazy person, I’m glad I learned Japanese because of how effortless it can be to read stuff in Japanese at times. Every time I see a block of text in hangeul when I open online articles I feel a tinge of anxiety and ominous dread because I have a point of comparison. It’s the analogy of why would you go back to black and white when you can have all the colors  or why go back windows 95 when you have windows 10 (I can’t think of a good one). The point is I’ve experienAUKjH7.md.pngced the wonders of reading Japanese. It’s obvious to me that the Japanese writing system plays an integral role in the popularity of reading in Japan. Also it seems like everyone on TV has written a book. I’ve always cared about being able to understand a piece of writing more than being able to read it loud. Also, I’ve never had to waste time looking up words like MARTHA or 오르가슴 or VOLDEMORT (no i was not reading harry potter) since they write foreign words in Katakana meanwhile I’ve had that bitter experience many times with Korean since they only write in hangeul (in printed books they write foreign names and foreign words in a different font). That was one of the most demotivating characteristics of Korean with respect to learning it for me personally. I am very happy and blessed to have found this site.

Ultimately for words like KASAI/HWAJAE I prefer to sort it out by encountering it multiple times with the hanja next to it when I read rather than seeing in anki or looking it up over and over and over and over when I read. I believe in being as lazy as possible at times by not going against the current.  I don’t aspire to reach a point in Korean where I read hangeul-only texts  “fluently” with such ease that going through the rolodex of words to find the corresponding meaning only based on the context is imperceptible to my consciousness. I have no desire to strive to reach or reach the level where I read hangeul like a Korean native. It’s a pipe dream that I never had for Korean. I’ve come to the conclusion that I read much faster when hanja is haphazardly (it’s just not 100% correct) inserted into the hangeul text via hanjaro and I completely accept it and embrace it. This fact will never reverse unless somehow I become illiterate in Japanese which seems impossible to me. My conviction is rooted in my literacy in Japanese,  my understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of the Korean and Japanese writing systems that I gained first-hand, and also from reading about the topic in 3 languages. I can’t imagine not running text through HANJARO before reading when I can. To me, not running a text through hanjaro is equivalent to asking myself if I want to subject myself to the experience of reading a Japanese article or book that’s only written in hiragana. That is torture! Sometimes reading hangeul feels like reading Japanese that’s only written in hiragana if the percentage of the words I don’t know (or I do know but have low familiarity with) is high enough. It’s just that much more demotivating and irritating. I think for me, I would’ve NEVER EVER EVER EVER learned Korean to this level if I didn’t now Japanese. It’s just way too frustrating, inefficient, and stupid otherwise. Plus the Korean-Japanese Naver dictionary is a god-send. It just feels like a waste of my time reading hiragana/hangeul that has no meaning to me. Reading a text or a book full of unknown words in Japanese is a completely different experience from reading a text of book full of unknown words in Korean because it’s just that much more fruitless and painful in Korean. The same can be said about using a korean-korean dictionary and japanese-japanese dictionary. It is NIGHT AND DAY! (but even DESPITE this DISPARITY I still have one of my authotkeys set for daum korean korean dictionary because there are more entries for Korean-Korean dictionaries than the korean-english dictionaries and I hate not finding the word in the damn dictionary. I do this to lessen my chance of wasting my time. Although the Korean-Korean dictionary comes with the risk of me running into definitions full of words I don’t know to explain the word I looked up, I still prefer that to the dictionary finding NOTHING and wasting my time. By the way I usually do not look up words in the korean definitions of words… I don’t care about those words and more importantly I run the risk of looking up the words defining the words in the definition and on and on lol! It’s a matter of choosing the lesser of the 2 evils. It’s a real nightmare that I don’t have to deal with for Japanese since they have better dictionaries and write stuff in hiragana/katakana and kanji. Of course my go-to authotkey script is for google searching the word with IMI WA appended to it). For Japanese even if you don’t know the word, if it’s written in kanji you get something out of it and you have some obscure, vague idea of it (and you can even use pop-up dictionaries like rikai-sama, yomi-chan, etc. pop-up dictionaries exist for Korean but they suck compared to japanese ones) while in Korean you can waste a lot of energy trying to figure out the meaning solely based off the “sound” of the word (the fact there are homonyms and countless hanja that share the same pronunciation doesn’t help. this was exemplified by the KASAI/HWAJE example I mentioned.).

I’ve always felt super entitled as a person who knows Japanese that whenever I looked up hanja-based words that I already know that sound similar to Japanese or exist in Japanese I would feel irritated and mercilessly robbed of my my time and energy. Also I know about the history of the Japanese language and the Korean language ( I inadvertently learned about the influx of foreign words into Japanese during the Meiji Era when I was reading a book about Korean/Korea in Japanese. ) which makes me even more flummoxed to being subjected to reading hangeul-only text. Now I have no reason to feel that resentment when I read Korean on the internet or ebooks! I have a lot of articles and topics I’m interested in reading on the Korean internet and now I can finally hop to it. I hope to read more in 2019!

HERE are some articles I read so far: I like reading about people or topics that are of interest to me.

http://www.hankookilbo.com/News/Read/201605122062423406
http://www.pressian.com/news/article.html?no=69280#09T0

https://www.sisain.co.kr/?mod=news&act=articleView&idxno=26576 <-this was hard to follow at times. It was pretty bad. I didn’t understand the main points of the article. It was unclear to me and I had no motivation to re-read stuff to figure out the meaning of the sentence or phrases. I kinda gave up on this one. It’s too hard for me at my current level or I’m just too lazy to apply myself (no that’s a good thing because I gotta read what I’m really interested in) I think I’ll read an article about it in Japanese sometime in the future. I feel content with my expectations and my goals. I don’t need to kill myself AND read anything and everything in Korean. I have a choice to read about topics in English or Japanese instead just so I can satisfy my curiosity without having to spend ungodly amounts of time and effort. It’s just more fruitful and beneficial to focus on reading stuff in Korean that I really want to read in Korean. Enjoyment is VERY important and can never be tossed aside.

http://news.donga.com/Culture/more29/3/all/20141010/67068211/1

https://namu.wiki/w/%EC%9B%90%EC%A0%95%EB%85%80

https://www.sisain.co.kr/?mod=news&act=articleView&idxno=24942 <- about hanja

http://news.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2014/03/02/2014030202553.html

http://monthly.chosun.com/client/mdaily/daily_view.asp?idx=1998&Newsnumb=2017111998

https://theqoo.net/square/1043395792   < – seungri’s interview

 

 

 

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승리입니다 제가 이시점에서 연예계를 은퇴를하는것이 좋을거같습니다. 사회적 물의를 일으킨 사안이 너무나 커 연예계 은퇴를 결심했습니다 수사중인 사안에 있어서는 성실하게 조사를 받아 쌓인 모든 의혹을 밝히도록 하겠습니다. 지난 한달반동안 국민들로부터 질타받고 미움받고 지금 국내 모든 수사기관들이 저를 조사하고 있는 상황에서 국민역적 으로까지 몰리는 상황인데 저 하나 살자고 주변 모두에게 피해주는일은 도저히 제스스로가 용납이 안됩니다 지난 10여 년간 많은 사랑을 베풀어준 국내외 많은 팬분들께 모든 진심을 다해 감사드리며 와이지와 빅뱅 명예를 위해서라도 저는 여기까지인거같습니다 다시한번 죄송하고 또 죄송합니다 그동안 모든분들께 감사했습니다

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tiffany’s apology

티파니, 자필 사과문 게재 “부끄럽다..깊이 반성 중”(전문)

tiffany’s main apology
http://news.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2016/08/26/2016082602778.html

https://www.hangeul.or.kr/modules/bbs/index.php?code=bbs23&mode=view&id=12281&page=14&___M_ID=47&f_head=&sfield=&sword=

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My Holy Grail CLOZE DELETION format for Anki cards made from Korean TV SHOWS

UPDATE to this ENTRY

front of card

word or word in a sentence, definition in japanese/korean/english, screenshot WITHOUT text

8n0mA3.md.png

Back of the card

answer to cloze, more definitions from wordquery, screenshot from Korean show.
8n0sV0.md.png

HS RAPPER (spoiler below)

HIGH SCHOOL RAPPER

to be completely honest I didn’t want young b to win high school rapper for the sole reason that I liked his song the least out of everyone who performed in the finals. I acknowledge that he’s great at rapping but I was confused as to how he got the most votes. Maybe it was different seeing the performance in person or maybe his popularity/fame from show me the money had a bearing on the results. I knew for the longest time he won this show because they mentioned it a million times on show me the money so when he finished performing on the HS finale I thought that’s it??? since he was the last to perform and the ante had been getting upped time and time again.

+++++ end of spoiler

well what I see is black and white since I use an ereader but it’s legible nonetheless. and there’s one more CLOZE card   that only has ttak blanked out with the {{c2:}} blahblah code .

another example:

FRONT: ++++++++++

8PUEr7.md.png

the Korean definition was generated by hanseido. I don’t obsesses and waste time trying to go 1000% monolingual dic especially for korean ( I love what steve kauffman says in his youtube vids about the issue.)

On an unrelated note I learned why  for certain korean/japanese words it’s so much easier just to learn the english word…. it was because the word was ORIGINALLY IN ENGLISH and it was translated to Japanese and then the korean people just took the words that japanese people painstakingly translated and just brought the words into korean by reading the words with their hanja readings. I found about it from a japanese book I was reading last month which talked about how Japan was obsessed with learning from other countries in the 1800s?? 1700s?? in the various advanced fields like science and so they had to translate all that shit from other languages to Japanese and of course they came across words that don’t exist in Japanese so they had to invent them using the kanji that they have. So that is why with some words it’s just easier to use English because it was the original word (but then again they translated from many languages…. not just english. there were so many countries with booming culture and sciences back in the day) and the 1 word is so much easier to remember than an explanation/essay. ).

I set up anki so that Hanseido look-ups come to the front of the card since I won’t even read it let alone remember it if it’s in the back). I usually don’t put screenshots in the front because it’s too much work (for this one I just felt like it and I thought it would help me remember) and I will never put a screenshot with text on the front.

Back:+++++++++++++++

8PURXb.md.png

Edit field just to show the multiple cloze deletions I have going on here. sometimes I do c3 for the definition. it all depends on what I feel like doing.

8PU1lT.md.png

An example with 3 clozes!

front:

AXUv2v.md.png

back:

AXUeo2.md.png

clozes:  

AXUSB9.md.png

FIRSTLY, I find cloze deletion and anki great for upper intermediate/advanced and may even more upper intermediate (these terms all just broad so..>). I don’t recommend it for beginners or intermediate

8n0tu9.md.pngI recently came up with a brilliant format and process for making anki cards for Korean while watching korean talk/variety shows. I’m sure it could be applicable to other languages too. I love cloze deletion cards and they are especially effective for me for Korean. This is in part due to my level, my vocabulary because I would think it’d be very taxing and painful to do cloze deletion cards as a beginner or intermediate even. If anything though I think you’re better off doing other things like actual reading/listening to build your vocab than making and reviewing srs cards if you’re a beginner (I think that using anki to learn the top 1000 words of a language to be really inefficient compared not using it especially if you have a lot of free time). I find it to be really helpful as an advanced korean learner. I hate the traditional sentence/plain word vocab card formats for Korean when using anki because to me it makes no sense to be testing yourself in anki the way you’re testing yourself whenever you watch any native material containing unknown words. Of course that was my go to format for Korean in the beginning!

The way I see it is that the whole point of doing anki cards is so that when i add word x 8n0OcQ.md.pngto anki and do the reviews I expect myself to recognize it (and remember the meaning) or at least know that it’s in my deck when I see it in the wild again. By recognizing I mean instantaneous recognition so anything longer than 5 seconds is really BAD. If I add word x by itself on the front or the sentence containing word x on the front of a card with the answer on the back (the usual flashcard/anki format) I’m essentially putting myself in the same exact situation as when I initially come across unknown words on a tv show or novel etc. for example, I’ll watch a tv show, they’ll say something I don’t know and they also happened to have the text across the screen and I care enough so I look it up in lingoes or google or naver etc. What usually happens is if I find the correct definition everything is crystal clear and I understood it and I may or may not completely forget the word or definition or both 5 minutes/30 seconds later. For me, the traditional format is too much work and it’s not effective. What happens is I either I don’t engage with it properly so I’m not really doing the reviews or I do engage with it properly and do the painful thing where I force myself to conjure the definition out of thin air since the only clue is the word or sentence containing the word only to mark AGAIN a month later or just draw a blank go no f’in idea (the former with the thinking hard thing is especially awful and ineffective in my experience). When I half-ass it I either read the sentence or half-read it (reading it in a lazy way) or don’t read it (but don’t realize I’m not reading it) or only read it a little of it (not enough) and I usually press the SHOW answer after 0.5 seconds (barely enough time to actually engage/think about it but I am impulsive like that especially when I am not into it and maybe I grew irritated at this format over the years), read the answer go yeah that seems familiar but for some reason I can’t remember it at all (or it’s like the first time I’m reading it) and proceed to press hard ASAP (again barely enough to read it or I half-read it) until I feel like hitting AGAIN in some future session. So of course this didn’t happen with all my korean cards but it happened frequently enough to make me not give a shit and keep marking hard, then again depending on how I felt rather than if I actually knew the answer. I acknowledge that my disenchantment towards Anki played a role in rendering the traditional format ineffective for me. That was inevitable from having used anki all these years and having a lazy disposition. However, I recall that even when I did my reviews seriously (using the traditional format of sentence/word on the front and definition on the back) I could tell some of it was just not working and I was wasting my energy.

8n0RA2.md.pngIf I add word x to anki and I want to be able to recognize it/remember the meaning when it pops up in native media in the future, the best way to remember it using it anki is not testing myself in the exact way that I encountered it in minus the sound ( I never considered adding audio to my korean cards because I don’t need IT and it takes up time. I only record if I’m going to ask people “what did this person say” ) I’ve realized doing that just makes no sense. one reason reason is that it’s BORING! I’ve tried bolding and underlining the word in the sentence to see if that would lower the burden and motivate me to read the anki card and it didn’t make much of a difference. It was because it did not change the fact that it’s boring to make myself to read a sentence I already read. You’re subjecting yourself to the same experience minus the audio. I feel that much more unmotivated to read something I already read especially if it has an unknown word in it. You have to practice SMART not HARD. Training and performing are completely different activities. Basketball players do other things besides play basketball to train and piano players don’t play the song over and over again from start to finish to practice. They do stuff in training that they don’t do during the performance because it’s effective. You could write out each of the regular usage kanji ( about 2000) a thousand times and still not be able to write all of them out off the top of your head (OF course I’m recommending RTK for this very reason) but I think in Korea they encourage nonsense like this last I heard because they love working hard (they should focus on working smart more). You have to approach it in a strategic manner or you’re just wasting time. It’s great that you’re hard-working and you have all this energy and drive to reach your goal but if you’re going it about it in the wrong way it can be 8n0ky5.md.pngineffective and tortuous! It’s not always no pain, no gain. So I finally realized exactly why the cloze deletion works so well for me. I knew it was more effective than the traditional formats for me but I couldn’t explain why. I knew that the traditional flashcard format card doesn’t make ANY sense.

I realized that clozing each syllable (I usually do every syllable of the word since most words are 2 syllables.  When the word is long ie 3 or more syllables I usually choose 2 syllables to blank out. If the word is really bad I cloze more than 2 syllables ) of the korean word makes it so much easier to remember. The only time I kill a whole word is if the word is one syllable and if it’s hard i give myself a hint with English alphabet like j for 지. erasing the whole word and trying to remember that is TOO MUCH WORK and I don’t think it’s worth it. You’d think that making 1 card is better than making 3 but it’s the exact OPPOSITE in my experience if you do it right (the time difference for making 3 cards vs 1 is a matter of 2 seconds and reviews for cloze deletions cards are much easier, faster, and more fun. Multiple cloze cards is like doing steps in ANKI except it’s better and more effective SINCE YOU are seeing variations of the card. Additionally, I can change the ease intervals etc so it really does take less time than the traditional format. It requires production from me but it’s not burdensome. In fact the traditional format of sentence on the front with the definition on the back is so burdensome I can’t even get myself to do the review properly AND I painfully go through the cycle of not remembering or mis-remembering – this is a waste of time and you most definitely never do this with cloze cards provided that you don’t cloze the whole word). It’s so much better than clozing just one syllable of the word or doing the traditional format of word on front or answer on back. I went through a phase where I made Korean anki cards like I made Japanese anki cards and had to acknowledge that it’s just not working for Korean. By that I mean that I would make only 1 cloze card for Korean WHERE I clozed one of the syllables of the word. something about the bacchim and number of possible vowel and sound combinations just make it hard to remember the word  or maybe it’s better to say that much easier to forget it or remember it vaguely or incorrectly (vague to the point that I don’t know if the word is in my deck or not or i have no idea what the f the word means even though the word has been in my deck for x years with a screenshot from the korean tv show) ie 3 or 4 syllable words that with syllables that all have different vowel sounds and some or all have different bacchim in them. hell even 2 syllable words can be tough to remember due to the myriad of bacchim/vowel combinations (though I know Japanese so I take full advantage of hanja to easily remember the sino-words ie not just thinking of the vowel of the sound as an arbitrary vowel since I know the damn hanja. ) Guess I love me some bacchim-less multi-syllable words that have repeating vowel sounds for the syllables like 비나리, 사이비,거시기,누리 lol (these words are random but easy to remember lol). CLOZE deletion is also wickedly effective for onomatopoeia compared to the traditional format. Cloze deletion cards help me notice things that I wouldn’t notice in the traditional format. Cloze deletion format is a MUST for me for Korean.

For Japanese I usually have only one cloze that’s one syllable (hiragana) of the word by itself or the word in the sentence with the full definition in japanese and english below it. When I tried to adopt the strategy for Korean it was still too difficult and I realized why…. so the ONE SYLLABLE in Korean is more complicated than the one syllable in Japanese since Korean has spelling and all these vowels and consonant sounds that don’t exist in Japanese and of course there are Japanese sounds that cannot be properly represented by Hangeul. I realized  the only way to make the cloze card effective for Korean is to make multiple cloze cards (c1 c2 c3). I didn’t like the idea of multiple cloze cards because you’re making 2 or 3 cards instead of just one but from doing the single c1 cloze with Korean I realize making multiple clozes actually takes less time overall since my anki settings are super lax anyway (I can mark easy that much more frequently and even if I press OKAY it’ll still send it out far. Currently my settings are set that for new cards it’s 7 days for okay and 11 days for good. I think my settings for japanese is like 9 days and 14 days?? also the step is 2900 minutes. I was initially hesitant about making my intervals that huge for Korean but it turned out to be a boon because I can truly focus my energies on cards that are difficult rather than begrudgingly press easy on easy cards too frequently which was exactly what I would’ve experienced with the default anki settings.).

Of course my retention rate is not 100% with the cloze deletion format but it’s definitely higher than the rate for the traditional format. And I don’t think you should be aiming for a 100% anyway… I don’t know what the exact ideal number is but I would rather be undertested than overtested. I want to reap the benefits from anki without the unnecessary time sink.

I’ve found some great ways to STREAMLINE THE PROCESS for generating cards while watching KOREAN talk/variety shows. I have a different for process for stuff I mine from reading because I go after efficiency.

I recommend and use the following:

lingoes dictionary – I use naver japnese/korean dictionary from 2009 (?)(that’s the date on lingoes if I remember correctly.). there’s also k-e. I like it because it’s really fast since it’s off-line and searches as you type. You can also set it up so it looks up text you double-click on, etc but it does not know how to unconjugate so it’s only helpful for nouns for the pop-up function.

Also recently I’ve fallen in love with the example sentences. I always ignored them until this year lol. I always ignored them because I only cared about what the word means in the instance that I came across.

AUTOHOTKEY (set to naver/daum/some korean-english dictionary/naver k-e example sentences/naver j-k examples sentences/ and my HG and OG Japanese google imi wa appended to the word). as I mentioned the lingoes dictionary is not up to date. I wish it was up to date! I got the idea from this blog https://mykorea.blog/look-up-a-word-or-phrase-in-a-korean-dictionary-using-autohotkey/ PAIR This with a gaming mouse with the macros set up and you WILL save a lot of time and feel more motivated to stuff up

WORD QUERY this anki plugin is amazing. after installing it you find and install the dictionaries then go to word-query when you’re in anki and set-up a card-template for the look-up. You put the word in the specified field and it generates the defintion entry in the specified field ! it does not know how to unconjugate since it searches the dictionary. It can be run in EDITING window and BROWSE window. The only downside is that for some of the dictionaries it will only insert 1 matching entry when there are more ie any word that is a homonym. I can circumvent the homonym issue for naver J-k by pasting from lingoes since the lingoes dictionary file is the same as the stardict naver JK dictionary file. Also, some dictionaries put all the definitions under 1 entry (the korean-english ones) which sometimes makes the entry extremely long. However, I do not spend time editing/trimming that stuff since I don’t have the time and it doesn’t bother me. I set it up so the wordquery stuff shows up on the back of the card.  The clutter doesn’t bother me lol.

click here for the 6 dictionaries that I use

to break it down

vicom is korean-english (from lingoes)

edocu is korean-english ( from lingoes)

quick-kor-ENG is korean-english

naverkrjp is korean-japanese

koreandic is korean-korean

hanja just inserts all the homonyms

the one titled github was a tsv file that I converted from this github page

I think there might be a duplicate there….

8n0rmo.md.pngFor Korean I use korean-english/ korean-korean and naver korean-japanese dictionary and the hanja dictionary (sometimes it’s helpful or maybe I just do it for the shits and giggles. it generates all the homophones in hanja form! I usually don’t pay attention to this).

I also use it in conjunction with readlang and rikaisama (Japanese)  since I import cards using those programs/services. Readlang doesn’t know how to unconjugate so you’d have to painstackingly unconjugate the verbs so I only use it on certain cards which I mark via tagging before importing.

HANSEIDO – This gives you korean definitions. I use it to mass generate defintions. I select all the korean cards in browse and generate the definition. again, it does not know how to unconjugate. you can not use it in the EDITING FIELD. It can only be executed in the browse field. I was curious and tested it to see if it would look up hanja since there are lotta of homophones depending on the word and it WORKED!

CLOZE DELETION SHORTCUT PLUGIN called BASIC C1 WRAPPER- I installed other plugins I would never use and replaced the code with the cloze deletion shortcut for c2 and c3 and c4 etc. so for me it’s control + 2, control +3, control + 4 to make the highlighted text clozed. there’s also the space bar one

CLOZE EACH CHARACTER PLUGIN –  it’s based off the cloze shortcut plugin which uses control + space bar AS THE shortcut for c1.  Therefore, the spacebar cloze plugin stops working if I install cloze each character. So, I chose this over the spacebar plugin!)

as is this (I use the new button/short-cut  for clearing all the clozes in the field) and this 

PAINT.NET PROGRAM – for  cutting out the text from the screenshots. I like this over gimp and MS paint and this other program. I use the shortcut key “s” to select a chunk of the picture so I can cut it and paste it into anki. Also I use the macro mouse for copy pasting (control c, control v). Unlike the other programs, paint.net has shortcuts for accessing a specific picture when you open up multiple pictures. Sometimes I take screenshots and save them to generate cards later and so after I open a handful of pictures I switch between the pictures by using the shortcuts control + 1 for the first pic open, control + 2 for the second pic open, etc etc

EDIT: I now use sharex. check out mattvsjapan’s youtube vid about the program!

8n0TQv.md.pngTWEAK ANKI SETTINGS

This isn’t a plugin or a program but anki is completely different with different settings. I used to be overtested like crazy from the default settings as well as the damn steps. So I don’t feel burdened or ashamed of generating multiple cloze deletion cards simply because my settings are set so I can push easy cards far out rather quickly and cloze deletion cards are easier to remember than regular cards and I did regular cards already and know they don’t work as well. My settings for Japanese are even more lax since I’m that much more confident and comfortable with Japanese. I have different settings for each deck depending my level and the format (THE CLOZE DELETION card format has huge ease intervals etc for obvious reasons!). as you get better at a language at the language you should increase the ease interval/etc.the default settings are just too much. and if you need those default settings8n0zse.md.png to retain a decent percentage than you’re probably better off not using anki and YOU SHOULD instead read and listen consistently to learn/familiarize yourself with the common words/sentence patterns/ etc.

https://vladsperspective.wordpress.com/2017/03/14/optimize-your-anki-youre-overtesting-yourself-on-too-few-cards-make-huge-gains/

and don’t forget to change the STEPS. I hate steps! My step is just one and it’s usually 2900 minutes. If I fail a card I do not want to see it 1 minute later since it will interrupt the flow of my anki review mojo. I love anki now. But seriously why the hell do people want to see anki cards 1 minute and 10 minutes after failing… that just sounds like torture. if you need to see it that frequently that maybe you shouldn’t have added that card. I feel more motivated to read my anki card after failing it if anki shows it to me 2 or 3 days from when I initially saw it rather than the next day or 5 minutes later.

When the dictionary and google and naver translate fail me I go to chiebukuro, reddit, or korean stack exchange. I prefer chiebukuro solely for the fact that it’s less of a pain in the ass. Also Japanese people are very kind and sometimes Japanese is better than English for the explanation since the 2 languages are grammatically similar but Japanese and Korean are very different languages and some shit is just is hard to translate to Japanese and vice versa. the stack exchange wants me to write a paragraph in the question field or something. it always bitches about how I don’t have enough text. It’s ridiculous.

8n0EnC.md.pngSo I usually download the episode than watch it on youtube or ondemandkorea etc because it’s so much more convenient with rewinding and fast-wording or even looping. I use kmplayer because I can set it up so that I can rewind and fastforward by scrolling my mouse and that is very convenient. Also I can press f5 and f6 to set point a and point b respectively so I can loop the video (I don’t use this often). also if I press control + c kmplayer will take a screenshot and put it in my clipboard which I can paste into paint/gimp/etc. KMPLAYER takes the screenshot of the video at full screen which makes the text BIGGER so it’s really convenient since korean shows are notorious for having small text. Meanwhile Japanese shows have HUGE text literally covering 20 % of the screen as you can see all over this post which I like for practical reasons ie reading/putting it into anki though sometimes I wish it were a little smaller but it’s still better than Korean TV text. I always gotta make the Japanese video smaller before taking a screenshot to add to anki while for Korean it’s ALWAYS fullscreen just to get that tiny text as big as possible.

So when i come across something that I want to add to anki I…

1) press control + c on kmplayer. I either let the video play ( I can rewind if I want to etc) or loop it at a specified scene.
2) paste in paint8n0SDk.md.png
3) search lingoes
4) run word query with control + enter (right enter). I set it up so that the word-query dictionary fields do not show up during reviews. they take up a lot of space so I just copy whatever I want into the cloze field.

5) if that doesn’t work I go to google or whatever. Or I could add a tag to it to go back to fill the definition in later so I can just keep watching the episode. sometimes I have to ask on chiebukuro or korean stack exchange and the responses can take days sometimes.

6) I cut out a square or rectangle that contains the text and paste into the screenshot field of my anki card. I set this to show up in the BACK. Sometimes I find the scene itself ( without the text) helpful to remember so i’ll include it on top of the text.

7) if I find something in lingoes with an example sentence I paste the definition, example sentence, japanese translation all on the same field. then I use the shortcut for cloze deleting and cloze delete each syllable of the word (usually 2), and a part of the definition (a syllable or two). I try not to make too many cloze deletion cards. I usually generate 2 cloze deletion cards since first card is for the syllable of the word & syllable(s) of the defintion and second card is for the second syllable. I cloze the definition under the cloze of the syllable that’s EASIER to remember. If the word is particularly hard I will make 2 clozes with 2 syllables of the word and a 3rd cloze with only parts of the definition clozed out ( I rarely do this one because I don’t like making 3 cards for a word unless the word is particularly tricky or challenging).  it all depends on how I perceive the difficulty of the word in terms of remembering it.

I repeat the steps if the word has another meaning (which was not used in the talk/variety show) that I think is easy to remember/ it seems worth remembering. kill 2 birds with one stone.

b) if lingoes doesn’t find anything but word query dictionary finds something then I use that. If i don’t have the sentence I just use word and definition with stuff clozed out.8n0lZa.md.png

** when I initially discovered the wonder of cloze deletion I was between a rock and a hard place because cloze-deleting a screenshot of a tv show is time-consuming (compared to clozing text with the ms paint and copy-pasting. i sure as hell won’t type out the sentence) but effective since the screenshot is memorable and I actually get something out of my anki review since something is blanked out. Inserting a screenshot that contains text without blanking anything out does nothing for me for korean. I realized one day I can just cloze the definition entry and put the screenshot on the back as a reminder/test as to why I care about the word. That’s why I love clozing the example sentences in lingoes. I feel more motivated to read the sentence or phrase in the screenshot knowing that I read the definition or explanation just a few seconds ago.

8) as I’m adding my cloze deletion cards I also add the word by itself to another field so I can look up all the crap on hanseido later on. I put the hanseido definition on the front since it’s a different definition than the one I grabbed from the other dictionaries and I’m more likely to read it if it’s on the front of the card. no scratch that; i will not read it if it’s on the back. it’s some psychological/conditioning thing!  I’m very impulsive with the pressing.

9) after I’m done adding for the day I run hanseido in browse

8n0nAx.md.png10 ) be amazed by the number of cards I Made (remember one word could have 2 or 3 cards) in one day and actually remember shit! If you want to know how many NOTES you have rather than number of cards, type Card:1 in your card browser after selecting the deck.

Anyway, going back to the initial example I gave courtesy of some episode of HIGH SCHOOL RAPPER. I know that if I did the traditional format of pasting the screenshot let’s say on the front and the answer on the back I may not remember the word or the meaning despite countless reviews on anki. For example what I get out of the anki reviews could be that it’s a 2 syllable word i failed a bunch of times, or a 2 syllable word that starts a with a gg sound, or I’ll remember the definition but not the word itself ( so I may not recognize thy the word when I see it in the wild) , or I’ll remember. the word but not remember the meaning ( or assign the meaning to that word). There’s too much going on in those 2 syllables to just make ONE CARD.  I gotta break it down to get something out of it.